Posts Tagged ‘ Zarina Wahab ’

Dil Dhadakne Do

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Dil Dhadakne Do
Release date: June 5, 2015
Directed by: Zoya Akhtar
Cast: Anil Kapoor, Shefali Shah, Priyanka Chopra, Ranveer Singh, Anushka Sharma, Rahul Bose, Farhan Akhtar, Parmeet Sethi, Vikrant Massey, Ridhima Sud, Zarina Wahab

If Karan Johar were to make Kabhi Khushi Kabhi Gham in the year 2015, and on a Mediterranean cruise, there’s a probability it could had have been closer to Dil Dhadakne Do. Pointless, unnecessary comparison aside, it would have had to cut down on some healthy jingoism and overt flash and the melodramatic razzmatazz.

2015 calls for a crisper, and a lighter hand at the job. 2015 calls for Zoya Akhtar to play with a family drama, which has bits and parts of relative predictability, with dollops of individual charisma and charm. The Millionaire Mehras, Neelam (Shefali Shah) and Kamal (Anil Kapoor) have an ordinary marriage crumbling on the inside, and a business that’s faced with a similar fate. To salvage one of the two, they host a wedding anniversary party on an exuberant ship which will take their guests around Istanbul.

Their son, Kabir (Ranveer Singh) is being prepped to take over as the heir once the Kamal steps down. Kabir tries. Kabir falters. Kabir flies a plane to get over it (!?).  Ayesha (Priyanka Chopra) is the driven-away daughter who’s grown on to be a successful businesswoman, post her halfhearted marriage to Manav (Rahul Bose) The Mehra parents are obviously discriminatory.

Along with being discriminatory, or sexist, they’re hypocrites just like every other human being, as their pet Pluto (voiced by Aamir Khan) points out. They are bigoted and dysfunctional, just like an ordinary set of old folks, no matter how rich or poor they may be. This is where the perennially impeccably dressed Mehras become fallible and vulnerable characters. What Zoya Akhtar doesn’t try to do out of her way is to make the supremely flawed parents become likable and utterly revered seniors from Baghban, instead she keeps them humane and grey.

The children bear the brunt and the fruits, of which they’re frequently reminded of their obligation towards the fruits they’ve cherished all their lives. They are asked of life-altering compromises in return at times. Ayesha and Kabir, as siblings, have grown past the age of petty fights and name-calling. They’ve graduated to silently understanding what the other feels, knowing where the other deserves his/her support, and when to let them handle the screw-up of the day.

The strongest relationship is shared by the siblings and the performances put in by Singh and Chopra enthuse the deserved spirit into their characters. Ranveer’s Kabir is cool, urbane and witty and not at all over-the-top boisterous showboarder; he’s the younger of the two and thus, fairly rebellious. Priyanka’s Ayesha is the older, much matured sister that knows her parents won’t give her credit where it’s due. Yet, she’s moved past that and is coping with a modern (go on, read modern as millennial, you internet-junkie) loveless marriage. And both of them run away with as much as they can by unrelentingly extracting from their screen time.

Anil Kapoor sportingly wields strands of grey hair and slips into the self-serving megalomaniac Kamal’s skin. He personifies the faulty patriarch. Shefali Shah’s Neelam is dealt a rough path. She’s stuck in a marriage, like many other women from any background find themselves, where the wife is being taken for granted and hence in turn, detonates the bomb of passive-aggression, forever. Shah is simply brilliant throughout, especially in the scene where she’s exemplifying the decorum for her son.

Dil Dhadakne Do is heartbreakingly authentic and harsh in the moments where the family is struggling to come to terms to the ground realities of their current lives. All the millions in the world can’t give you complete control over the events in your life. It’s here that the film earns its ticket price. It takes a set of elite, classic “10 percent” haves and makes them not seem stumbling drunks, addicts or weeping bags of douchebags. They manage to deal with it, albeit in stylish suits and on lavish locations.

Light humor and powerful cameos by Anushka Sharma and Farhan Akhtar and the entire ensemble cast ensures there’s no seasickness on this voyage. How could I not make a sea metaphor!
Special mention to the single-shot approach on the song Gallan Goodiyaan. The song starts off as annoyingly loud and then seamlessly transitions into a fun number.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

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Bobby Jasoos

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Bobby Jasoos
Release date: July 4, 2014
Directed by: Samar Shaikh
Cast: Vidya Balan, Ali Fazal, Prasad Barve, Aakash Dahiya, Supriya Pathak, Tanve Azmi, Benaf Dadachandji, Rajendra Gupta, Zarina Wahab, Arjan Bajwa, Anupriya Goenka, Kiran Kumar

If I push you right into the plot of the film without giving you a proper introduction to the basic story, you would feel that my review is jerky. That is just one of the only few problems with Bobby Jasoos. The wobbly start and an immediate change of course towards the last act of the film are perhaps the only major hiccups in this fun and innovative caper.

Bilkis Ahmed a.k.a. Bobby is a self-trained private detective with no professional connections, she takes up cases for her friends, and other near ones. In disguise, she can fool even her family into thinking that she isn’t the one they’re asking to read their palm, under a tree, right in the middle of a bustling street. Running her office with  Shetty (Prasad Barve) who runs his Cyber Cafe, their chemistry is slowly established. Shetty is an unsaid Salman Khan fan, he shows his fandom by never claiming it openly by wearing overly fitting t-shirts and a turquoise bracelet.

Assisting her are Munna (Aakash Dahiya) and even her family women, comprising of her mother played by Supriya Pathak, her aunt Kausar Khala (Tanve Azmi) and her sister Noor (Benaf Dadachandji) even though her father (Rajendra Gupta) is opposed  to the concept of his daughter pacing around the bylanes of Old Hyderabad, chasing random strangers and prying on their lives. A lucrative offer from Anees Khan (Kiran Kumar) starts adding the stars and honors to Bobby’s credentials, but as she progresses she realizes it isn’t just a spy job.

The detailing in Bobby’s appearance is precious to look at, she carries a handy pack of Parle-G biscuits and a bottle of water handy in her backpack. She pretends to be busy when an able competitor shows up to check out her office. Even her friends, be it Shetty or Tasawwur (Ali Fazal) who seeks her help to reject prospective brides, have their own likeability factor going for them. Ali Fazal grows as a performer and suits the part perfectly. The ensemble of Gupta, Pathak, Azmi, Dadachandji and Kiran Kumar assist in keeping even the bit players entertaining.

The strength of Bobby Jasoos lies in its writing and acting, up until the final resolution to the film’s major conflicts. The unveiling of the climactic suspense is disappointing, not as much as a heavy underhanded attempt at keeping the film feel-goody. The way the makers decide to pull it through, leaving behind some vital hints behind, the jigsaw pieces don’t fit into the puzzle perfectly. Coupled with a completely unnecessary song-and-dance dream sequence number, the poor music and background score don’t help their case either.

Again, Vidya Balan is the quintessential ‘hero’ of the film here, and the director chooses to treat her struggles at the family front with as much justice as her professional dilemmas. It’s a simple scene at the end, it is touching, but as a viewer, I didn’t feel particularly moved by its purpose and the lines said by the two involved characters here. Surely the moments of Bobby’s professional growth and the inkling of a love life were the most enjoyable portions for me.

Bobby Jasoos with its rich template of cinematography and colorful moments is a good film with its flaws. Not many makers dare to venture with a story as unconventional as this at its core.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5)

Himmatwala

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Himmatwala
Release date: March 29, 2013
Directed by: Sajid Khan
Cast: Ajay Devgn, Tamannaah Bhatia, Paresh Rawal, Mahesh Manjrekar, Adhyayan Suman, Zarina Wahab, Leena Jumani

By not choosing to waste precious bandwidth, I’ll keep this very short and scathing. Himmatwala, as Sajid Khan claims is supposed to be an ‘entertainer’ more than a film. Heck, Heck, it’s not even as captivating as a cat running after a laser light.

The ghastly duo of Sajid-Farhad are entrusted with providing a “screenplay” and the dialogues and trust them to come up with puerile jokes that are possibly cracked by kindergarten kids. The usual quick-paced delivery of those lines causes you to stay in amazement of how repetitive, unoriginal and uninventive can anyone working at this level be.

One piece of such genius is manifested by this, “Naarayan Das, jitni tum ne saansein li hain, isne (pointing at a killer) us se zyaada jaanein li hain.” Whoa! As unrealistic as what Sajid Khan’s definition of entertainment is. Tamannaah is blessed with unintentionally hilarious catchphrase, “I hate gareebs.” and that pretty much sums up her character’s gist.

Also, all actors were particularly asked to ham it up, cos that’s entertainment! Khan also vociferously negates his claim of creating “Family entertainers” with his regular homoerotic shtick featuring Paresh Rawal and Mahesh Manjrekar. He tries the spoof approach towards the original Himmatwala by constantly making the actors break the fourth wall, “surprisingly” choosing Paresh Rawal –  who handled the job in Mr. and Mrs. Khiladi, to interact with the audience for a major part.

The only small changes Khan makes in this remake are insignificant, but a special one is where Devgn is a “street fighter”, whereas Jeetendra was an engineer in the original. Quite progressive! Not to mention the cheap and immature ‘CG’ where the tiger’s fight sequences look like this:

If you’re going to stare at Tamannaah and/or the five-dance-girls-in-one-item-song novelty, you’ll kick yourself in the nuts and/or ovaries. The entire “entertainer” is irrelevant, boring and outlandishly demeaning to the viewer’s hard-earned hundred and fifty bucks.

My rating:  1/2 (.5 out of 5 stars)

Agneepath Review


Agneepath
Release Date: January 26, 2012
Directed by: Karan Malhotra
Cast: Hrithik Roshan, Priyanka Chopra, Sanjay Dutt, Rishi Kapoor, Zarina Wahab, Om Puri, Chetan Pandit.

No matter however “different” an approach a filmmaker uses, there are obvious referrals & comparisons with the set standards of the original film. The viewers always refrain from remembering what they don’t want to and carry a set of frame of reference while going in for the remade classics. I am a fan of the original Agneepath and its unabashed commercial nature. The new one doesn’t fall short of the mainstream nuances as well.

The film gets off at a brisk pace, considering the original Agneepath’s run time of a massive three hours. And somehow, the child playing the junior Vijay Chauhan (Arish Bhiwandiwala) is spectacularly similar in appearance to the child who played the same role in the original (Master Manjunath) Vijay has an inane righteousness and a will to stand up against injustice and he will put up a tough fight with the last thread of his soiled banyan (vest) The story goes on to bring up an evil Kancha (Sanjay Dutt) who is out on a self-inflicted treacherous path to overcome his hidden demons. Vijay’s father, Master Deenanath is lynched by the horrific ways of Kancha and an instigated village mob to get rid of all opposition to turn the local village factory into a cocaine hub. The gut-wrenching tragedy makes the doom-struck family to move on to the big city, Mumbai. The “fire”, of revenge that is, still simmering in Vijay’s heart, mind or body seeks out some support that would help him to become the powerful drug lord that would then avenge his father’s death. Rauf Lala (Riahi Kapoor) is that potion that makes our pint-sized Viju into the new ruler of Dongri.

Priyanka Chopra’s character, Kaali Gaawde is stemmed out of a clear stereotype. After the initial few scenes, the original characteristics of her character disappear and you get the ordinary heroine of our current times. The role of our actresses in our films, especially in the overtly-hyped ventures has just stagnated to a meagre “support” for our alpha male’s soft points to be highlighted. The usual journey of hardships and the survival of our protagonist is portrayed with empathy and loud background scores, though appealing. The original characters of the earlier Agneepath don’t have the same amount of screen time, but Karan Malhotra puts up vivid colours in the form of a varied range of character components.

You get a lot of muscle behind every scene, but the film never manages to reach the appropriate depth of each character. Kancha gets more of his vindictive appeal from his appearance than his deeds; the grown-up Vijay has no emotions raging through him, except for the usual monotonous ones. In all honesty, no other actor has more beef in his role than Rishi Kapoor. The film’s music fits in at some junctures, and makes a loss of continuous action at others.

Chikni Chameli will get them to sail past through the weekend storm, the twist in the original plot will help them go further, but this remake is definitely not better than the Yash Johar commercial masterpiece. (That comparison is too hard to resist for anyone) Agneepath stands for whatever it is meant to and entertains you with a garishly decorated ensemble of void characters.

My rating:  **1/2

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