Posts Tagged ‘ Shakun Batra ’

Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921)

Kapoor-Sons-Poster

Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921)
Release date: March 18, 2016
Directed by: Shakun Batra
Cast: Rishi Kapoor, Rajat Kapoor, Ratna Pathak, Fawad Khan, Sidharth Malhotra, Alia Bhatt

In the myriad of films that revolve around familial relationships, drops another flick about dysfunctional dynamics and the chaos that they can bring along. Last year, it was Zoya Akhtar’s Dil Dhadakne Dowhich was all about loving your family, albeit on a heavily fashionable cruise somewhere in Europe; Shakun Batra’s Kapoors are tucked in cozily in their mounded house in Coonoor. The Kapoors share plenty of similarities with other filmy clans, they’re good looking, charming, probably even good at sport! That’s where the similarities seem to end.

The family patriarch is a dirty grandpa (Rishi Kapoor) who practises falling dead at a dining table. He still harbors fantasies of skinny dipping into the ocean with attractive women beside him. An aggravated heart condition puts him in a hospital bed and the news is communicated to his two grandsons, Rahul (Fawad Khan) and Arjun (Sidharth Malhotra), both of whom have relocated to different parts of the world with a common underlying ambition. With prosthetic makeup on, Rishi Kapoor’s Daadu is the center of action and attention, as he expresses few of his “dying wishes”. One of those wishes is to capture all of his family in a happy picture.

There’s pent up tension manifesting in fights and confrontations between every possible pair of characters, be it Sunita (Ratna Pathak Shah) and her husband Harsh (Rajat Kapoor), or just the brothers, or Sunita and either of her sons. As frequent as the throwing of objects and abuses is, equally frequent are the apologies and ironing out of differences. Above all, there’s an overbearing theme of acceptance. Arjun strives to gain the acceptance of his parents as he’s always been the lesser of the two sons. Rahul seeks a nod of approval for settling down with the person that he loves. Suneeta struggles to acknowledge her sons’ decisions and her husband’s indifference.

All of this emotional heavy lifting and drama is eased in after creating a universe where the characters grow on you through hilarious exchanges between the main cast and light fringe characters, and amongst themselves. The humor borders on adult content, surprisingly, yet rarely coming across as too desperate. A lot of this humor is sucked out of the narrative in the post-intermission half. Alia Bhatt’s Tia isn’t always kept as a major player, and as the screenplay goes, it’s refreshing to see the “love interest” angle be sidelined. She’s smart, funny, and never too stuck up. Rahul and Tia’s cool make up for Arjun and Suneeta’s sentimental hotheadedness.

Fawad Khan has a slightly bulging waistline and suddenly I am no longer ashamed about mine. His character is the refined, vanilla good boy and gosh, he’s adeptly well-equipped at that. Shah and Kapoor, work well off each other, with their constant bickering and brief moments of affection. Rishi Kapoor holds it all together with his part-poised-part-boisterous Daadu. He is offensive, and an ardent Mandakini with a big mouth on him.

Unlike earlier filmy families of the past, where you’d be just amazed at the scale of the personal choppers, handbags, car sizes, Shakun Batra’s family drama is a blessing. They don’t even immediately fix the big dent on the rundown car after a minor accident! Nothing is sugarcoated, no silly aashirwaads and a hundred aartis; just some fists thrown at each other, a few smokes shared in dark nights and a healthy dose of realistic issues and a moving depiction of entertaining events.

Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921), as one of the characters mouth in the film, is all about giving an ending to the viewers that we all can’t seem to achieve, but an end that we all want.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu Review

ImageEk Main Aur Ekk Tu
Release Date: February 10, 2012
Directed by: Shakun Batra
Cast: Kareena Kapoor, Imran Khan, Boman Irani, Ratna Pathak Shah, Ram Kapoor, Manasi Scott.

Las Vegas, one of the most renowned cities for getting laid, broke and married is the place where our protagonists live, with their dreary jobs. Rahul Kapoor (Imran Khan) is an architect brought up to excel in everything that he does, may it be vanity or swimming or both of them simultaneously. His parents are quite a pair of two different humans as well, played by Boman Irani and Ratna Pathak Shah. Rahul is expected to get a gold medal that his dad has been yearning for. The beasts of burden have always haunted Rahul, he stays to be a bland and dull guy who often fumbles with his words.

Rianna Braganza (Kareena Kapoor), a hair stylist by profession is the ubiquitous opposite of Rahul. They both seek psychological help, albeit for different reasons. That is where their paths cross & you start to think it is gonna be another What Happens in Vegas. Yes, they do get married, but they are on terms for its prompt annulment. The journey that ensues is a lot of fun, since they get married on Christmas.

The film creates a bunch of refreshing situations: one where Rahul’s dad’s friend (Ram Kapoor) tries to help Rahul to get a bit ‘loose’, the date with Rahul’s ex-girlfriend. The story passes by at a steady pace in the form of days. Each day has a certain name attached to it. This rom com doesn’t make you cry, and still provides credibility. Peppered with not too imposing music by Amit Trived, the tracks remain hummable and easy to go on.

I wish not to be killed for saying this, Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu has a new feel to it. It isn’t mushy nor intolerable. Director Shakun Batra attempts at a safe approach for a debut film, but doesn’t go down the tried and tested path all the time. He serves a dessert, that has a few different ingredients with the usual ones, making it scrumptious to eat while it lasts. Watch it for a delighting experience.

My Rating: ***  (3 out of 5)

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