Posts Tagged ‘ Sanjay Dutt ’

PK

pk-posterPK
Release date: December 19, 2014
Directed by: Rajkumar Hirani
Cast: Anushka Sharma, Sushant Singh Rajput, Aamir Khan, Sanjay Dutt, Saurabh Shukla, Boman Irani, Parikshit Sahni

In the December of 2009, 3 Idiots, the “highest grossing entertainer” of all times released with the same protagonist and the same director at its helm. I would reserve my observations about that film, but the similarities keep soaring in my mind. Of course, the glaring disconnect between the two is the lack of any attention to the supporting characters in PK.

Hirani along with Abhijat Joshi creates his title character as an outsider (Aamir Khan) to India’s belief systems. The outsider doesn’t know how the societies work, what’s acceptable and what’s not. He loses his way out of here and relies on the innumerable human gods for hope and answers because he has no friends and no relatives. Jagat Janani (Anushka Sharma) chances upon PK and decides to help him through her news channel.

The news channel head (Boman Irani) indulges PK with his questions about birth control, and is thoroughly impressed by his “amazing questions”. Groan. Once the film goes down the path of using a TV show as a confrontation between its only self-admitted antagonist–Tapasvi Maharaj (Saurabh Shukla) and the ever inquisitive PK, it all goes downhill.

The dichotomies and differences between the religions present hearty laughs and play out as a continuous gag; turning potentially sensitive situations into perfectly innocuous moments of lovable relativity. The writers go to originality in spurts and come up with a few new devices that turn conventional scenarios around. Unfortunately, these spurts of originality cease at being used to rake up humor and nothing beyond that.

The post-interval part is reluctant at going for an emotional depth and eventually turns out to be manipulative and shallow; where a bomb goes off and there’s no gravitas attached to the scene. It’s just something that you’re supposed to care about, but the characters on the screen underplay it and thus the film chickens out of attaching any strong subtext.

The prolonged climax of the film is insufferable to say the least. It descends into a full blown TV debate between the two aforementioned characters and the interviewees completely hijack the show and the anchor and the producer have absolutely no control over it. Yes, it’s a film and they get cinematic liberties. But I wouldn’t be pointing this out if it was the only thing that was far-fetched. What follows that and ends in a telephonic conversation with Sarfaraz (Sushant Singh Rajput) in Pakistan is outrageously ludicrous.

It’s an all Aamir Khan show here. He shoulders the entire film, not because the other actors are doing a bad job, rather they don’t get to do much. Everyone’s made out to be a sidekick to this Bhojpuri-mouthing great ashternaut (sic) His chaste Bhojpuri makes him endearing and affable, instead of thriving on the usual poor representation of the language in self-righteous Hindi films.

PK is just about a kindhearted blockbuster in its approach, which makes it ironically un-kindhearted and seem more like an insincere crossover between Hrithik Roshan’s Koi Mil Gaya and Paresh Rawal starrer OMG-Oh My God!

My rating: **1/2 (2.5 out of 5)

Agneepath Review


Agneepath
Release Date: January 26, 2012
Directed by: Karan Malhotra
Cast: Hrithik Roshan, Priyanka Chopra, Sanjay Dutt, Rishi Kapoor, Zarina Wahab, Om Puri, Chetan Pandit.

No matter however “different” an approach a filmmaker uses, there are obvious referrals & comparisons with the set standards of the original film. The viewers always refrain from remembering what they don’t want to and carry a set of frame of reference while going in for the remade classics. I am a fan of the original Agneepath and its unabashed commercial nature. The new one doesn’t fall short of the mainstream nuances as well.

The film gets off at a brisk pace, considering the original Agneepath’s run time of a massive three hours. And somehow, the child playing the junior Vijay Chauhan (Arish Bhiwandiwala) is spectacularly similar in appearance to the child who played the same role in the original (Master Manjunath) Vijay has an inane righteousness and a will to stand up against injustice and he will put up a tough fight with the last thread of his soiled banyan (vest) The story goes on to bring up an evil Kancha (Sanjay Dutt) who is out on a self-inflicted treacherous path to overcome his hidden demons. Vijay’s father, Master Deenanath is lynched by the horrific ways of Kancha and an instigated village mob to get rid of all opposition to turn the local village factory into a cocaine hub. The gut-wrenching tragedy makes the doom-struck family to move on to the big city, Mumbai. The “fire”, of revenge that is, still simmering in Vijay’s heart, mind or body seeks out some support that would help him to become the powerful drug lord that would then avenge his father’s death. Rauf Lala (Riahi Kapoor) is that potion that makes our pint-sized Viju into the new ruler of Dongri.

Priyanka Chopra’s character, Kaali Gaawde is stemmed out of a clear stereotype. After the initial few scenes, the original characteristics of her character disappear and you get the ordinary heroine of our current times. The role of our actresses in our films, especially in the overtly-hyped ventures has just stagnated to a meagre “support” for our alpha male’s soft points to be highlighted. The usual journey of hardships and the survival of our protagonist is portrayed with empathy and loud background scores, though appealing. The original characters of the earlier Agneepath don’t have the same amount of screen time, but Karan Malhotra puts up vivid colours in the form of a varied range of character components.

You get a lot of muscle behind every scene, but the film never manages to reach the appropriate depth of each character. Kancha gets more of his vindictive appeal from his appearance than his deeds; the grown-up Vijay has no emotions raging through him, except for the usual monotonous ones. In all honesty, no other actor has more beef in his role than Rishi Kapoor. The film’s music fits in at some junctures, and makes a loss of continuous action at others.

Chikni Chameli will get them to sail past through the weekend storm, the twist in the original plot will help them go further, but this remake is definitely not better than the Yash Johar commercial masterpiece. (That comparison is too hard to resist for anyone) Agneepath stands for whatever it is meant to and entertains you with a garishly decorated ensemble of void characters.

My rating:  **1/2

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