Posts Tagged ‘ Sai Paranjpye ’

Chashme Baddoor

Chashme_Baddoor_(2013_film)_Poster
Chashme Baddoor
Release date: April 5, 2013
Directed by: David Dhawan
Cast: Ali Zafar, Divyendu Sharma, Siddharth Narayan, Taapsee Pannu, Anupam Kher, Bharti Achrekar, Rishi Kapoor, Lilette Dubey

Falling on the mighty back of the 1981 original, the remake borrows heavily from it. Every major plot device is the same, only tweaked in the smallest possible way.

The basic plot remains the same, and the makers go out on a limb to incorporate every major situation/scene from the classic. I’m making an attempt at how the writers were asked to come up with the screenplay. Probably handed over a checklist with the following bullets.

  • Chamko detergent segment.
  • Make Siddharth the good guy. (We don’t care if you can’t show it by his mannerisms and other nuances, just make some of the ensemble cast say it loud for the audience.)
  • The boys must have an outstanding debt.
  • Make Jai and Omi escape through the window and stand on the building ledge, when Seema (not Neha) comes to see Jai.
  • Use the same dated kidnapping shtick to make the protagonist win over the girl at the end.

There’s the usual, “deliver a pseudo-funny line at every juncture, the circumstances of the story should have absolutely no effect on the viewer and keep them laughing” forced humor. (WHY!?)

Out of the two new sub-plots, one is in which Rishi Kapoor substitutes Saeed Jaffrey’s Lallan Miyaan and add a romantic interest for him, i.e. landlord Lilette Dubey. And the second features Anupam Kher in a pointless double role as Seema’s (Taapsee Pannu) father and uncle. Both of the above have absolutely zero impact and add very less to the narrative. Out of all the performances, Divyendu’s jokes do less, and his delivery along with his expressions in rest of his scenes somewhat elevates the film.

The songs try too hard to be witty by making the lyrics, uh, whatever they are. The speed and the loudness of the thick beats does little to help them either. Also, there’s poor dubbing or as though it seems. There are awkward cuts and therefor there are obvious issues with this remake in every department. The laughs come in throughout, but new material is far and few between.

Chashme Buddoor‘s original flavor has a lot to keep you entertained, but yet this Chashme BADdoor failed to keep this viewer amused. Perhaps, it was their way of warning us how the remake is going to be different from the original by putting a ‘BAD’ right there in Buddoor.

My rating: ** (Two stars out of five)

Chashme Buddoor (Original Remastered)

chashme-baddoor-poster
Chashme Buddoor
Re-release date: April 5, 2013
Directed by: Sai Paranjpye
Cinematography: Virendra Saini
Music: Raj Kamal
Produced by: Gul Anand
Cast: Deepti Naval, Faarooq Shaikh, Rakesh Bedi, Ravi Baswani, Saeed Jaffrey, Leela Mishra
Digitally remastered by: Reliance Media Works

This is not a review, it’s more of a summary on how the 1981 film is still relevant, entertaining and a source of reference for comedies even in this age.

Before starting with it, I made a pact with myself that I’ll refrain from using the phrase “cult classic” as much as I can. So if you do not catch the free flowing mention of the overused same adjective, it’s all a deliberate task.

Chashme Buddoor was a timeless tale of three friends with a love for a vice and no other interest in common, except for Jomo (Ravi Baswani) and Omi’s (Rakesh Bedi) penchant for hitting on women consistently. The basic storyline may have been exploited in just about a few hundred succeeding comedy shows and films, but to capture the inherent spirit of the original has been nearly impossible.

I’ll be reviewing the remake later in the day, thereby judging the subsequent flurry of relativity or a new creative invention altogether. What I am sure about at the moment is that the actual innovative plot devices used here are still very quirky and hilarious. The colour restoration manages to make the aged film appear rejuvenated and vibrant. There’s very less image distortion due to grains or pixels owing to the much larger current screen size as the original resolution seems to have been retained.

There’s nostalgia; the pure innocuous nature of the lead pair relationship can never fail to evoke those certain “Aw that’s so cute” out of you. No, I didn’t do that. Okay, I almost did. The wholesome and subtle entertainment factor of the eighties’ new wave is sure to make you reminisce, if you were around for its actual release that is.

Besides all of the reasons described above, the re-release market in India is fairly poor, so if you’re not sure whether you wanna watch the new remake or invest in a promised good product, Chashme Buddoor is an easy choice to make this weekend. Kudos to the developers for pulling off a good job with the restoration and not going overboard.

And yes, it’s a treat to watch the stalwarts in all their flawless glory and also relive Kaali Ghodi Dwaar Khadi with all its simplistic appeal.

P.S. How could I resist breaking that aforementioned pact! It’s a cult classic, and you’ll be foolish to miss watching a film with a lot of smoking and without the irritating, moronic “Smoking is injurious to health” footer.

No rating

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