Posts Tagged ‘ Rishi Kapoor ’

Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921)

Kapoor-Sons-Poster

Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921)
Release date: March 18, 2016
Directed by: Shakun Batra
Cast: Rishi Kapoor, Rajat Kapoor, Ratna Pathak, Fawad Khan, Sidharth Malhotra, Alia Bhatt

In the myriad of films that revolve around familial relationships, drops another flick about dysfunctional dynamics and the chaos that they can bring along. Last year, it was Zoya Akhtar’s Dil Dhadakne Dowhich was all about loving your family, albeit on a heavily fashionable cruise somewhere in Europe; Shakun Batra’s Kapoors are tucked in cozily in their mounded house in Coonoor. The Kapoors share plenty of similarities with other filmy clans, they’re good looking, charming, probably even good at sport! That’s where the similarities seem to end.

The family patriarch is a dirty grandpa (Rishi Kapoor) who practises falling dead at a dining table. He still harbors fantasies of skinny dipping into the ocean with attractive women beside him. An aggravated heart condition puts him in a hospital bed and the news is communicated to his two grandsons, Rahul (Fawad Khan) and Arjun (Sidharth Malhotra), both of whom have relocated to different parts of the world with a common underlying ambition. With prosthetic makeup on, Rishi Kapoor’s Daadu is the center of action and attention, as he expresses few of his “dying wishes”. One of those wishes is to capture all of his family in a happy picture.

There’s pent up tension manifesting in fights and confrontations between every possible pair of characters, be it Sunita (Ratna Pathak Shah) and her husband Harsh (Rajat Kapoor), or just the brothers, or Sunita and either of her sons. As frequent as the throwing of objects and abuses is, equally frequent are the apologies and ironing out of differences. Above all, there’s an overbearing theme of acceptance. Arjun strives to gain the acceptance of his parents as he’s always been the lesser of the two sons. Rahul seeks a nod of approval for settling down with the person that he loves. Suneeta struggles to acknowledge her sons’ decisions and her husband’s indifference.

All of this emotional heavy lifting and drama is eased in after creating a universe where the characters grow on you through hilarious exchanges between the main cast and light fringe characters, and amongst themselves. The humor borders on adult content, surprisingly, yet rarely coming across as too desperate. A lot of this humor is sucked out of the narrative in the post-intermission half. Alia Bhatt’s Tia isn’t always kept as a major player, and as the screenplay goes, it’s refreshing to see the “love interest” angle be sidelined. She’s smart, funny, and never too stuck up. Rahul and Tia’s cool make up for Arjun and Suneeta’s sentimental hotheadedness.

Fawad Khan has a slightly bulging waistline and suddenly I am no longer ashamed about mine. His character is the refined, vanilla good boy and gosh, he’s adeptly well-equipped at that. Shah and Kapoor, work well off each other, with their constant bickering and brief moments of affection. Rishi Kapoor holds it all together with his part-poised-part-boisterous Daadu. He is offensive, and an ardent Mandakini with a big mouth on him.

Unlike earlier filmy families of the past, where you’d be just amazed at the scale of the personal choppers, handbags, car sizes, Shakun Batra’s family drama is a blessing. They don’t even immediately fix the big dent on the rundown car after a minor accident! Nothing is sugarcoated, no silly aashirwaads and a hundred aartis; just some fists thrown at each other, a few smokes shared in dark nights and a healthy dose of realistic issues and a moving depiction of entertaining events.

Kapoor & Sons (Since 1921), as one of the characters mouth in the film, is all about giving an ending to the viewers that we all can’t seem to achieve, but an end that we all want.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Shuddh Desi Romance

Shuddh_Desi_Romance_poster
Shuddh Desi Romance
Release date: September 6, 2013
Directed by: Maneesh Sharma
Cast: Sushant Singh Rajput, Parineeti Chopra, Vaani Kapoor, Rishi Kapoor, Rajesh Sharma, Tarun Vyas

Romantic liaisons are as much a part of the Indian youth’s ordinary lives as much as the internet or mobile phones. Or the lack of public bathrooms all over India. Hey mom & dad, no, I’m not a part of that youth. Also, this same public denial of being in a relationship with someone, is rooted to a conscious mentality which makes us look down upon couples just holding hands or even sitting next to each other.

And there are few, who aren’t shy of the stares and glares, they are just scared of being restricted to just one person for the rest of their lives; or the ones who don’t deem the wedlock to be the be all and end all. You could fit into in any of the above categories, I know I do. To go slightly overboard, the same Indian women who dote on Barney Stinson/Charlie Harper’s flirtatious television persona, have very contradicting double standards in actuality.

Shuddh Desi Romance puts some of the above apprehensions in a tier-2 city (Jaipur) setting with its characters desperately trying to break out of their cultural and traditional limits. Raghuram (Sushant Singh Rajput) is running away from a lot of things: his name, his relationship status, and a fixed job. Gayatri (Parineeti Chopra) is independent, speaks out her mind and has trust issues. Tara (Vaani Kapoor) has compromised on her ambitions to get “settled” into a familial discourse.

The three protagonists here depict common dilemmas faced by a major chunk of youngsters all over. It is the same emphasis on the title characters more than the plot that creates interesting dynamics in the otherwise overused love triangle format. Both Raghuram and Gayatri work with Goyal (Rishi Kapoor) and pose as guests at lavish weddings. Thus focusing on the inherent hollowness of grand Indian weddings.

As the emotional conflicts are takeoffs from our ordinary circumstances and so are the lines, Gayatri’s simple “Kya hai?”, Raghuram’s flirtatious “I don’t mind.” and Tara’s relieving “Ek thanda dena” prove to be gems in a situational context. The three have their own defense mechanisms, their own comfort zones and their own vulnerabilities.

SDR doesn’t thrive on being preachy in its conclusion, unlike its promotional posters. Perhaps the film lags in the second half in comparison to the first, but the charm and wit never runs out. Even when an incident of unfaithfulness is encountered, they simply talk it out in a closed room.

There aren’t much stock roles, and that works to the strength of the film. Chopra stands out amongst the lot in her performance, her composure, her grit are both captivating. Rajput is disarming and yet naive at the right moments. The two Kapoors (Not biologically or lawfully related to each other. Yet.) are good foils to the dominating presence of Rajput and Chopra.

More importantly, will Shuddh Desi Romance, with all its favoritism towards live-in relationships, cast a spell on your commitment-obsessed girlfriend or your parents who are insisting you to get married? It may. Or it may not. And that is the whole point here, the makers gradually shift the spotlight from the characters to a basic storyline at the end. It becomes about how two like-minded commitment phobics can mutually coexist.

For me, SDR is an extremely likeable film with a balance of realism and introspection. Extra points for the fresh music score.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

D-Day

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D-Day
Release date: July 19, 2013
Directed by: Nikhil Advani
Cast: Irrfan Khan, Arjun Rampal, Nasser, Huma Qureshi, Shruti Haasan, Rishi Kapoor, Chandan Roy Sanyal, K. K. Raina, Imran Hasnee, Shriswara, Dwij

Nikhil Advani’s D-Day starts off  with a literal bang in the form of Duma Dum Mast Kalandar being performed (read as lip synced) by Rajpal Yadav as a member of a wedding band, in a plush Pakistani hotel on Goldman’s son Salim’s pre-marriage party and a secret op occurring in the background. Making you expect a muscling adrenaline infected punch-and-kick extravaganza.

As Goldman (Rishi Kapoor) is almost in trouble as are the special agents, the film goes in a reflective flashback. Building a backstory for all the major characters, namely Wali Khan (Irrfan Khan), Rudra Pratap Singh (Arjun Rampal), Zoya Rehman (Huma Qureshi) the screenplay becomes more inclusive and appears to be dragging. But much later in the second half, they use the same over-ripe character sketches to provide for a twist in the plot.

Rishi Kapoor plays the you-know-who India’s most wanted criminal and with his rose tinted glasses, he seems cut out for the role of an evolved and aging Dawood Ibrahim. Irrfan doles out fine emotions when needed and a mean streak when it gets heavy. He plays the soothing husband to the fittingly casted Shriswara and a spoiling father to Dwij. There are flaws in the plot and the usual “I am calling off the operation, but you don’t have to stop it.” line gets too cheesy for me.

Though the second half is bereft of any such explicit glitches, D-Day embarks on a fantasy trip of defeating the targeted criminals in an overbearing way turning out to be pleasantly (not exactly pleasant, but rather tightly) entertaining. The final story is gripping and glues your butt to the seat. Also, the short monologue by Goldman is utterly hilarious for a satirical tirade along with the final message in Arjun Rampal’s voice just sums up our audiences in a line. Pay attention to that.

The direction is smart and subtle, Advani pits parallel tracks stealthily distracting from the situational music numbers. And given the number of songs with Rampal and Haasan together, bless him for not succumbing to feature in a song and dance fiesta.  The mise en scene renders a hazy texture to the thriller saga and thereby catalyzes Tushar Kanti Ray’s stylish cinematography.

D-Day is intelligent and intentionally non-preachy. Never straying from the agenda, a very strong addition to the very limited Hindi action thriller category.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Aurangzeb

aurangzeb-poster
Aurangzeb
Release date: May 17, 2013
Directed by: Atul Sabharwal
Cast: Arjun Kapoor, Rishi Kapoor, Prithviraj, Sasheh Agha, Sikandar Kher, Tanvi Azmi, Amrita Singh, Jackie Shroff, Deepti Naval, Swara Bhaskar, Sumeet Vyas, Kavi Shastri

Aurangzeb takes comfort in describing itself as an action thriller film, but it’s more of an etched out drama. Encasing an Indian family dispute into a game of power and a fight to the finish, definitely abiding by the long inculcated principles.

Prithviraj’s character Arya Phogat – a police inspector; plays the involved narrator who’s also one of the lead players of the story. His dying father (a brief guest appearance by Anupam Kher) asks of him a promise and Arya unwillingly starts his way towards fulfilling it. His uncle Ravikant (Rishi Kapoor) knows all about this and is also in the police. In fact Ravikant’s son Dev (Sikandar Kher) and son-in-law Vishnu (Sumeet Vyas) are also cops.

This isn’t good cop bad cop. Yet. Arya’s step brother Vishal and his long-lost twin brother Ajay – both the characters played by Arjun Kapoor; are the biological sons of Veera (Tanvi Azmi) and Yashvardhan (Jackie Shroff) who are separated due to some incidents and now they are required to swap themselves and convince the world around them. Sasheh Agha plays Ritu, Ajay’s girlfriend who is now used to his sadist tendencies.

The first half starts out with heavy drama and a few theatrical introductions, eventually building some intrigue at the halfway mark. Being the film that it is, the number of people in the cast is extensive but abused at times. Like Deepti Naval portraying a nameless wife to Ravikant, faces a shock that their son-in-law’s death wasn’t a suicide. She has a brief reaction in the background, probably aimed for greater consequences but sheared at the editor’s table.

That wasn’t the only awkward cut in Aurangzeb though. There are a few more loose ends and you begin to lose hope that this is just another semblance of family reunion fluff of the seventies, but the makers decide to emphasize on the builder-government-police corruption angle in Gurgaon’s ‘booming’ infrastructure sector and a beckon for the cops to act with a backbone and opt out of the influential cut.

Arjun Kapoor in his double role is flexible in ranging his emotions from the demure Vishal to the outlandishly cocky Ajay. Rishi Kapoor is entrusted to utter the forced Aurangzeb ideologies here and he doesn’t disappoint. What you take away with you after the film has ended, are the individual performances. Amrita Singh and Jackie Shroff shine here as well.

All in all, Aurangzeb has a story to tell, and with very less light moments, it does accomplish to make you believe in the what-is-he-going-to-do-next moments. For a film that takes itself so seriously, it flounders with technical absurdities at important junctures. (I haven’t specified because they could result in being spoilers)

My rating: *** (3 out of 5 stars)

Chashme Baddoor

Chashme_Baddoor_(2013_film)_Poster
Chashme Baddoor
Release date: April 5, 2013
Directed by: David Dhawan
Cast: Ali Zafar, Divyendu Sharma, Siddharth Narayan, Taapsee Pannu, Anupam Kher, Bharti Achrekar, Rishi Kapoor, Lilette Dubey

Falling on the mighty back of the 1981 original, the remake borrows heavily from it. Every major plot device is the same, only tweaked in the smallest possible way.

The basic plot remains the same, and the makers go out on a limb to incorporate every major situation/scene from the classic. I’m making an attempt at how the writers were asked to come up with the screenplay. Probably handed over a checklist with the following bullets.

  • Chamko detergent segment.
  • Make Siddharth the good guy. (We don’t care if you can’t show it by his mannerisms and other nuances, just make some of the ensemble cast say it loud for the audience.)
  • The boys must have an outstanding debt.
  • Make Jai and Omi escape through the window and stand on the building ledge, when Seema (not Neha) comes to see Jai.
  • Use the same dated kidnapping shtick to make the protagonist win over the girl at the end.

There’s the usual, “deliver a pseudo-funny line at every juncture, the circumstances of the story should have absolutely no effect on the viewer and keep them laughing” forced humor. (WHY!?)

Out of the two new sub-plots, one is in which Rishi Kapoor substitutes Saeed Jaffrey’s Lallan Miyaan and add a romantic interest for him, i.e. landlord Lilette Dubey. And the second features Anupam Kher in a pointless double role as Seema’s (Taapsee Pannu) father and uncle. Both of the above have absolutely zero impact and add very less to the narrative. Out of all the performances, Divyendu’s jokes do less, and his delivery along with his expressions in rest of his scenes somewhat elevates the film.

The songs try too hard to be witty by making the lyrics, uh, whatever they are. The speed and the loudness of the thick beats does little to help them either. Also, there’s poor dubbing or as though it seems. There are awkward cuts and therefor there are obvious issues with this remake in every department. The laughs come in throughout, but new material is far and few between.

Chashme Buddoor‘s original flavor has a lot to keep you entertained, but yet this Chashme BADdoor failed to keep this viewer amused. Perhaps, it was their way of warning us how the remake is going to be different from the original by putting a ‘BAD’ right there in Buddoor.

My rating: ** (Two stars out of five)

Jab Tak Hai Jaan


Jab Tak Hai Jaan
Release date: November 13, 2012
Directed by: Yash Chopra
Cast: Shahrukh Khan, Katrina Kaif, Anushka Sharma

Placed in the midst of ginormous expectations and sour comments over the initial release of its videos, Jab Tak Hai Jaan had a lot of roadblocks as challenges in its way, even before hitting the screens. Did it live up to the expectations? Sure, read on!

Set in London around 10 years ago, Samar Anand (Shahrukh Khan) is a youngster who’s looking for a job to break his family tradition of being an officer in the army because his mother doesn’t want any more military deaths in her family. Or so he says. He does odd jobs and tries to earn as much as he can. And while doing one such cleaning job, he comes across Meera Thapad (Katrina Kaif) heading into a church. She’s got her own way with God where she asks for things and gives up a thing in return to please him.

After a song and a rare smoking sequence featuring our lead actress in her engagement dress, Meera and Samar have their first real conversation. Along the way they pull off the brilliantly captured dance sequence preceding Ishq Shava and the scenery around it. Katrina dances with much oomph and you are pretty much shocked. This is where the protagonists’  feelings get convoluted and the much obscure hurdles now start surfacing. There are no tyrannical fathers and uncles, but there are spiritual (?) issues.

Akira (Anushka Sharma) is a peppy, self-proclaimed ‘heartless bitch’ who bears a stark contrast to Samar and Meera’s approach to love and relationships. She’s not scared of jumping out of relationships and doesn’t care about anything beyond sex.  And she isn’t scared of jumping into ice-cold water for a dare too! Uh, okay. Akira is acquainted with a much calm and serious layer of Samar’s personality as now he defuses bombs without protective gear. But he has his reasons for that. She’s intrigued about him and decides to share this story of a fearless man who’s diffused 98 bombs so far.

What you see in this plot isn’t hunky-dory bubblegum material crap, you get to watch people in their actual habitats: cussing, enjoying, kissing and sharing private humor. Which is where the strength of the film lies, the women aren’t insecure about their man’s choices, and independent in their own element. Meera is grounded yet confident about her decisions, Akira flirts to the extent of picking up Samar to make him get into his element. Yes, there’s the part where Samar calls Akira by ‘Kurosawa’.

Anil Mehta’s cinematography is brilliant and so artistically pleasing that sometimes, you forget there’s also a floundering story playing on the same screen. More than the music, the instrumental theme of JTHJ is more catchy and melodious. Even Challa isn’t a video capturing London’s scenery, it serves a purpose and yes, Shahrukh strums the guitar when the guitar’s playing in the back, unlike the cutsized promos. Saans shows you immaculate chemistry between the characters and I’ve already praised the entire Ishq Shava sequence. There’s light witty comedy as well, but it’s only subtle.

Yash Chopra shows how he’s evolved since his last film Veer-Zaara, he doesn’t hold back from letting his characters cuss like youngsters usually do and making them unpretentious and more real. There is no dancing around trees in chiffon sarees for the heroines and no cringe-in-your-seat moment. Shahrukh shows the shift in his character’s evolution with charm, Katrina looks like a million bucks and retains the grace associated with quintessential Yashraj heroines. Anushka plays her chirpy and upfront brash character smoothly.

Finally, Jab Tak Hai Jaan is a love story based on the conflict between a woman’s beliefs and love, and a man’s undying passion. It’s a film laced with its own imperfections and pivotal flaws with the screenplay, although perfectly finished in many departments. Yashji’s final outing as a director is quite watchable.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Agneepath Review


Agneepath
Release Date: January 26, 2012
Directed by: Karan Malhotra
Cast: Hrithik Roshan, Priyanka Chopra, Sanjay Dutt, Rishi Kapoor, Zarina Wahab, Om Puri, Chetan Pandit.

No matter however “different” an approach a filmmaker uses, there are obvious referrals & comparisons with the set standards of the original film. The viewers always refrain from remembering what they don’t want to and carry a set of frame of reference while going in for the remade classics. I am a fan of the original Agneepath and its unabashed commercial nature. The new one doesn’t fall short of the mainstream nuances as well.

The film gets off at a brisk pace, considering the original Agneepath’s run time of a massive three hours. And somehow, the child playing the junior Vijay Chauhan (Arish Bhiwandiwala) is spectacularly similar in appearance to the child who played the same role in the original (Master Manjunath) Vijay has an inane righteousness and a will to stand up against injustice and he will put up a tough fight with the last thread of his soiled banyan (vest) The story goes on to bring up an evil Kancha (Sanjay Dutt) who is out on a self-inflicted treacherous path to overcome his hidden demons. Vijay’s father, Master Deenanath is lynched by the horrific ways of Kancha and an instigated village mob to get rid of all opposition to turn the local village factory into a cocaine hub. The gut-wrenching tragedy makes the doom-struck family to move on to the big city, Mumbai. The “fire”, of revenge that is, still simmering in Vijay’s heart, mind or body seeks out some support that would help him to become the powerful drug lord that would then avenge his father’s death. Rauf Lala (Riahi Kapoor) is that potion that makes our pint-sized Viju into the new ruler of Dongri.

Priyanka Chopra’s character, Kaali Gaawde is stemmed out of a clear stereotype. After the initial few scenes, the original characteristics of her character disappear and you get the ordinary heroine of our current times. The role of our actresses in our films, especially in the overtly-hyped ventures has just stagnated to a meagre “support” for our alpha male’s soft points to be highlighted. The usual journey of hardships and the survival of our protagonist is portrayed with empathy and loud background scores, though appealing. The original characters of the earlier Agneepath don’t have the same amount of screen time, but Karan Malhotra puts up vivid colours in the form of a varied range of character components.

You get a lot of muscle behind every scene, but the film never manages to reach the appropriate depth of each character. Kancha gets more of his vindictive appeal from his appearance than his deeds; the grown-up Vijay has no emotions raging through him, except for the usual monotonous ones. In all honesty, no other actor has more beef in his role than Rishi Kapoor. The film’s music fits in at some junctures, and makes a loss of continuous action at others.

Chikni Chameli will get them to sail past through the weekend storm, the twist in the original plot will help them go further, but this remake is definitely not better than the Yash Johar commercial masterpiece. (That comparison is too hard to resist for anyone) Agneepath stands for whatever it is meant to and entertains you with a garishly decorated ensemble of void characters.

My rating:  **1/2

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