Posts Tagged ‘ Prakash Belawadi ’

Airlift

Airlift-poster

Airlift
Release date: January 22, 2015
Directed by: Raja Krishna Menon
Cast: Akshay Kumar, Nimrat Kaur, Inaamulhaq, Purab Kohli, Prakash Belawadi, Kumud Mishra

What the entire world and its cousin, i.e. Venus and/or Mars, seem to have forgotten in the annals of history, Raja Krishna Menon attempts to resuscitate after the recent rescue efforts by the Indian government to bring back Indians from the currently war-torn regions of Iraq and Syria. The ‘original’ airlift mission of 1990 is all but faded away, where not a single source on the internet credits Sunny Matthews and a certain Mr Vedi, a man whose first name is not in print anywhere. All the glory for the biggest rescue operation is handed out to the Indian government of that period, and its bureaucrats.

Menon creates a solitary character out of the multiple men that formed the core committee of the entire initiative in Kuwait and names him Ranjit Katiyal (Akshay Kumar), a self-centered businessman who prides himself in being a Kuwaiti and flinches even at Hindi music that his driver happens to play on a car ride just a day before the unexpected Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. Then Iraq president, Saddam Hussein’s army of 16 year olds runs wild and sets fire, its guns and penis at everything that is Kuwaiti. People of Indian origin do get a leeway as Hussein considered them as friends.

After witnessing a relatively not-so-barbaric act of war, Katiyal panics and fears for the safety of his family. On his wife’s insistence, he decides to flee to London. He tries to crack a deal with Iraqi Major Khaled (Inaamulhaq) through which he can escape the country. Katiyal, on the way back home, stops over at his office, only to see all of his employees huddled together. He realizes that these people have nowhere to go, and a sudden sense of self-realization sets in him. He decides to use his power and money to guarantee the security of these Indian employees.

He goes to great lengths to keep them protected, but that wouldn’t be enough if they are to stay alive. He tries to establish communication with the apathetic ministry of external affairs back in India. Katiyal goes back and forth between being a messiah and a self-doubting fool of hope, thus offering Akshay Kumar to perform as well as he does. Nimrat Kaur as Amrita finds her feet slowly into the film, shining in moments where her husband is questioned, or questions himself. The soppy and unnecessary romantic track playing in the background looks great as Kaur flashes her smile at her character’s husband, thus displaying the individual strength that she brings to the table.

Prakash Belawadi’s character George Kutty is a small gem in itself. He’s the ever grumbling Malayali middle-aged man who feels entitled all the time and shows his displeasure with anything in an over-the-top fashion. We all know rambling ”uncles” like him, and none of us are quite fond of them. Inaamullhaq, with his Saddam Hussein impression, wears the Iraqi accent like his tailor-made war jacket. He’s charmingly slimy as the money-hungry mid-level army officer. Akshay Kumar feeds off the support characters and restrains his character and even lets his vulnerability flow out in tears. His character indulges in conversational humor, the kind which Kumar must have forgotten exists after years of slapstick tomfoolery.

Kumar ‘airlifts’ his acting career every year with one ‘good’ film and this time he lets the film overpower him. Where his peers are still vehemently coloring their beards and hair to appear younger, Kumar repeatedly lets his age show realistically; making you hope that he sticks to just this way of working and age gracefully by giving up on the silly franchise films he keeps acting in. But again, that’s his prerogative. Airlift has moments of thrill, often scaring you of the consequences. Menon and his cinematographer Priya Seth shoot special scenes just to show how potentially dangerous the young Iraqi soldiers can be, creating a sense of doom in the viewers’ minds every time they appear. The limited, but gruesome depiction of war crimes is the biggest achievement of the film, and in that they create a very strong antagonist.

The bureaucracy red-tape angle plays calmly in parallel where Kumud Mishra as Sanjiv Kohli keeps knocking on the door of his superiors to rescue the Indians in Kuwait. He fights his own small battle and provides for a good subplot within the film.

Airlift is a poignant tale of how a few Indians carried out one of the most successful mass-evacuation and serves as an important reminder of, as a line goes in the film, “Chot lagne par ma-ma hi chillaate hain“.

My rating: **** (4 out of 5)

Wazir

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Wazir
Release date: January 8, 2016
Directed by: Bejoy Nambiar
Cast: Farhan Akhtar, Aditi Rao Hyderi, Amitabh Bachchan, Manav Kaul, Anjum Sharma, Nasir Khan, Neil Nitin Mukesh

Wazir hits the ground running with a quick montage to show us the origins of Daanish (Farhan Akhtar) and Ruhana (Aditi Rao Hyderi) marriage with Sonu Nigam’s sweet Tere Bin playing in the background. He’s with the Anti Terrorism Squad, and she’s a classical dancer. Together, they raise a daughter and due to Daanish’s one rash decision, their happy family is faced with a gruesome outcome.

There onwards, Daanish is continuously shown as a mope who’s too naive and impulsive for an officer with the amount of experience that he has. He deals with high octane violence and tactical ops, and yet he falls for whatever trap there is laid in front of him. Omkarnath (Amitabh Bachchan) extends an arm of friendship and consolation to the grief-struck Daanish, which he hesitatingly accepts.

The two men share a bond where both of them have a loss of a similar kind, except Omkarnath is an amputee chess maestro who’s organizing a play in his daughter’s memory. His character has a dead wife, a dead daughter, no legs, and was driven out of his home in Kashmir. There are times when he appears too happy for what he’s suffered. That, perhaps, is the gist of the writing for him. He mouths the wittiest of lines and yet, his eyes are too wide. They’re hard to believe. Shockingly, this small detail isn’t put to great use by making Daanish doubt his intentions at any point of the film.

Their common enemy, welfare minister Yazaad Qureshi (Manav Kaul) is the masterful antagonist who’s slimy and classy in equal proportions. Neil Nitin Mukesh gets a good, short cameo and John Abraham makes exactly three appearances as a “hacker” or an IT expert or, seriously, I don’t know what. The action sequences, especially the shootout in the dark scene is shot excellently. The pace never falls slow, which consequently helps yield a taut and gripping film.

Hints for the final ‘reveal’, or twist, are carefully left behind to answer all your questions. Farhan Akhtar brings a degree of restraint to his Daanish, but he can’t elevate the character above the poor writing for him. Daanish, the supposedly smart ATS officer, does things so stupid that Akhtar, the uber cool actor, can’t salvage. Omkarnath, on the other hand, is very calculative and so is Bachchan’s portrayal of the character. The amputee aspect isn’t hammered again and again (Good) and still used in subtle ways. Also, Aditi Rao Hyderi is utterly graceful with her moves and equally adept at being the fragile Ruhana.

Every song is woven well with the narrative, except a generic “Maula Mere Maula” that makes you wonder if you’re still watching the same film or a factory-made one-size-fits-all potboiler. The film earns a lot of points in the not-being-a-bore department by its sheer speed and direction. Bejoy Nambiar has delivered two richly stylized films earlier, and here he tones it down by a few notches and understandably so.

Wazir is a fast-paced film with a not a particularly smart protagonist, but it’s sharp and wily right from the opening titles to the rolling credits.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5)

Talvar

Talvar-Poster

Talvar
Release date: October 2, 2015
Directed by: Meghna Gulzar
Cast: Irrfan Khan, Konkona Sensharma, Neeraj Kabi, Sohum Shah, Shishir Sharma, Prakash Belawadi, Gajraj Rao, Tabu, Atul Kumar, Sumit Gulati

In the summer of 2008, a juggernaut hit the Indian TV waves. It was the Indian Premier League (IPL) and as one of the many theories suggested, the domestic helps in the Arushi-Hemraj double murders were bonding over a cricket match, on the night the mysterious killings took place. There was another theory which suggested that Arushi wanted to get back at her parents for something real bad. All of these theories, some debunked, some not, were polar opposites of the other.

The selection of the right theory is perhaps the part where a case is said to be solved. That selection is corroborated with some testimonies, and/or material evidence. Some cases are “easy” to crack, either by force or by a criminal confession. When proven right, the entire process is a treat to watch at the cinema halls and a great read in the papers. When the investigation goes awry, it’s a disturbing fact to consume that someone innocent could be punished for someone else’s transgressions, or “justice will be denied” forever.

Names of the characters are tweaked by a letter or two, and Talvar takes an outsider view at the whole murder mystery. There are several vantage points, and none from the inside. There’s the Kanhaiya (Krishna in the actual story, played by Sumit Gulati) angle, then there’s the local police’s bumbling perspective, ‘CDI’ investigator Ashwin Kumar (Arun Kumar from CBI, enacted by Irrfan Khan) piecing together the puzzle with his own story, and the chaste Hindi speaking CDI officer Paul (Atul Kumar).

Every perspective plays out in Rashomon fashion, always adding layers to what’s known to the world. Every time the story is retold, the order of events is changed, the agenda is changed, and even the killer. The film does take a stand, after making its point in an eight minute long debate between the two separate teams of investigators; both of them biased towards their own findings and prejudiced towards the other’s methods and observations. The stellar performances of all the cast members keep the proceedings engaging, even with the grim content at hand.

The state of affairs is only alleviated, with Vishal Bharadwaj at the helm of the writing department. In the midst of horrid allegations and depictions, there are sardonic lines from our lives that lighten the tone of events. Gajraj Rao, Sumit Gulati and Atul Kumar are vital bit players that hold the film well with their respective performances. Khan is at the center of the film, not just in terms of current star power, but also in terms of his character’s positioning. He’s shown to be the beacon of light, no matter how realistically fallible.

Ship of Theseus actors Neeraj Kabi as Ramesh and Sohum Shah as Ashwin Kumar’s junior have their hands full and they deliver well. Konkona Sensharma blends in with every shade that is given to her character, in the way of different ‘flashbacks’.

Talvar reiterates symbolically, that solving crime is just another job for some. At the same time, it’s a job with an inevitable but disallowed margin of error. How an actual murder mystery unveils in ‘real life’. Definitely not like an episode from Sherlock. 

My rating: **** (4 out of 5)

Madras Cafe

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Madras Cafe
Release date: August 23, 2013
Directed by: Shoojit Sircar
Cast: John Abraham, Rashi Khanna, Nargis Fakhri, Siddharth Basu, Prakash Belawadi, Piyush Pandey, Dibang, Ajay Rathnam, Agnello Dias, Leena Maria Paul

First off, on a personal note, I managed to watch Chennai Express (August 8) and Once Upon Ay Time in Mumbai Dobaara (August 16) but owing to connectivity/system issues I couldn’t post complete reviews here. None of it was intentional, trust me I’d have so loved to bash OUATIMD.

The review for Madras Cafe starts here.

Shoojit Sircar’s ambitious docudrama on India’s efforts in Sri Lanka to maintain peace and the strong reactions of the Sri Lankan rebel forces borders more on factual detailing in a slightly fictitious background. Yes, it does takes guts to make a film on real-life incidents in our highly volatile country, but guts don’t necessarily guarantee a good product.

Major Vikram Singh (John Abraham) is an Indian intelligence officer dispatched to Sri Lanka to head Research And Analysis Wing’s covert operations. With the issues that a serviceman has to face in his marital affairs owing to long periods of separation, he arrives in the conflict-hit area of Jaffna. In a cliched laced encounter with Jaya (Nargis Fakhri), Vikram establishes a clunky relationship with her. She is an international journalist out to cover the civil war.

RD (Siddharth Basu) is Singh’s supportive superior operating from India and Bala (Prakash Belawadi) is the shady head of intelligence in Sri Lanka who likes to have his way. Confronted by tricky political decisions and life-endangering predicaments, Vikram is forced to change his approach towards resolving matters. As India’s interference grows in the rebellion army’s actions, an assassination conspiracy is hatched and the impending fate is inevitable.

it is the same path that the makers opt for in the film’s third act which makes for great viewing. A dark end in a culturally and politically neutral narrative is rare to come across, it’s the hesitation in going all the way with using authentic names for historical figures’ that left this viewer with a sour aftertaste. I know this India, where people are increasingly getting offended at the slightest of display of opinions even though they are increasingly getting offensive in public discourse. Yes, this calls for another blog post at another time but I just feel shortchanged a bit. And yes, it was somewhat compensated by the inclusion of Tagore’s “Where the mind is without fear” at the end.

The period setups may not be exactly realistic, yet the performances of the actors are extremely sharp and nuanced. Siddharth Basu in his first outing as an actor keeps you engaged with his confidence and poise, Prakash Belwadi is perhaps the star here. He delves into the aggressive body language and delivers very well. Abraham underplays and Rashi Khanna as his wife Ruby is competent. A gaffe that could potentially lead to disbelief arising in believable situations is that everyone talks in Hindi, even the Sri Lankan biggies, but Nargis Fakhri’s character doesn’t. Intentional or forced, hard to comprehend.

At the crux of it all, Madras Cafe is particularly good for a cautious espionage-thriller. The finale is purely brilliant and simply boosts the film’s flaws convincingly.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

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