Posts Tagged ‘ Paresh Rawal ’

Himmatwala

Himmatwala-movie-poster
Himmatwala
Release date: March 29, 2013
Directed by: Sajid Khan
Cast: Ajay Devgn, Tamannaah Bhatia, Paresh Rawal, Mahesh Manjrekar, Adhyayan Suman, Zarina Wahab, Leena Jumani

By not choosing to waste precious bandwidth, I’ll keep this very short and scathing. Himmatwala, as Sajid Khan claims is supposed to be an ‘entertainer’ more than a film. Heck, Heck, it’s not even as captivating as a cat running after a laser light.

The ghastly duo of Sajid-Farhad are entrusted with providing a “screenplay” and the dialogues and trust them to come up with puerile jokes that are possibly cracked by kindergarten kids. The usual quick-paced delivery of those lines causes you to stay in amazement of how repetitive, unoriginal and uninventive can anyone working at this level be.

One piece of such genius is manifested by this, “Naarayan Das, jitni tum ne saansein li hain, isne (pointing at a killer) us se zyaada jaanein li hain.” Whoa! As unrealistic as what Sajid Khan’s definition of entertainment is. Tamannaah is blessed with unintentionally hilarious catchphrase, “I hate gareebs.” and that pretty much sums up her character’s gist.

Also, all actors were particularly asked to ham it up, cos that’s entertainment! Khan also vociferously negates his claim of creating “Family entertainers” with his regular homoerotic shtick featuring Paresh Rawal and Mahesh Manjrekar. He tries the spoof approach towards the original Himmatwala by constantly making the actors break the fourth wall, “surprisingly” choosing Paresh Rawal –  who handled the job in Mr. and Mrs. Khiladi, to interact with the audience for a major part.

The only small changes Khan makes in this remake are insignificant, but a special one is where Devgn is a “street fighter”, whereas Jeetendra was an engineer in the original. Quite progressive! Not to mention the cheap and immature ‘CG’ where the tiger’s fight sequences look like this:

If you’re going to stare at Tamannaah and/or the five-dance-girls-in-one-item-song novelty, you’ll kick yourself in the nuts and/or ovaries. The entire “entertainer” is irrelevant, boring and outlandishly demeaning to the viewer’s hard-earned hundred and fifty bucks.

My rating:  1/2 (.5 out of 5 stars)

Table No. 21

tableno21-poster
Table No. 21
Release date: January 4, 2013
Directed by: Aditya Datt
Cast: Rajeev Khandelwal, Tena Desae, Paresh Rawal, Hanif Hilal

Table No. 21 starts with a disclaimer about the Article 21 of the Indian Constitution. That is the only spoiler that I’m letting out in this review, and you better not Google it if you want to keep the underlying plot hidden. Aditya Datt presents a semblance of a psychological thriller with this film.

Vivaan (Rajeev Khandelwal) and his wife Seeya (Tena Desae) have won a contest and are on their way to an all expense paid trip to Fiji. They have their moments and a few twitches in their relationship along the way. As their tour package is about to get over, their marriage anniversary approaches and they plan on celebrating it.

They receive an anonymous gift and are invited to another exotic island in honour of their anniversary. The couple willingly accepts them both and are accosted to Abdul Rasheed Khan’s (played by Paresh Rawal) luxury resort. He charms them and lures them into participating in an truth-based reality show. AND THE PRIZE IS 10 MILLION FIJI DOLLARS! The plot gets murky when the rules of the game prove to be life-risking and eventually fatal.

Rajeev Khandelwal’s character is shown to be very sensitive and makes him a boring drag in the flashback sequences, while the end reveals a much contradicting side to his role’s persona making it hard to be believable; but at the end that’s what this film pretty much sums up. There are corny lines and a few witty ones as well, but the resounding piece of dialogue that keeps resurfacing is “If you lie, you die.” The game format of ‘truth-and-dare’ gets ludicrous at certain points.

The imagery is pleasant and a lot of voyeuristic cameras are used, given the format of the reality show. The climax of the film gives a message but at times appears to be very long. Music is limited and tolerable and the background score creates intrigue and suspense. The impending suspense isn’t a “Did the butler kill the mistress?” but interesting and entertaining. There aren’t any loose ends and there are hints all along to place the pieces in the jigsaw puzzle slowly as the story proceeds.

For a film that primarily revolves around three characters, Khandelwal and Rawal keep evolving gradually, hence keeping the viewers interested. Tena Desae is fairly good (can’t blame her for she’s shown to be incessantly weeping) Table No. 21 tries to cover a few social messages along the narrative and that makes the entire film more relevant. But the ultimate motif of the film may seem bit out of place as India is enraged with a whole bunch of other issues, which could ultimately make this film lost in the shuffle.

At the end, Table No. 21 is entertaining and smartly ropes in the societal shtick.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5)

OMG Oh My God


OMG Oh My God
Release date: September 28, 2012
Directed by: Umesh Shukla
Cast: Paresh Rawal, Akshay Kumar, Mithun Chakraborty, Govind Namdeo, Lubna Salim, Murli Sharma, Mahesh Manjrekar, Poonam Jhawer

More than any other source of rationale, the internet and different forms of entertainment have caused the most amount of disbelief in our respective faiths. OMG Oh My God borders on the lines of agnosticism, atheism and theism and the fake godmen business.

Adapted from a Gujarati play Kanji viruddh Kanji (Kanji vs. Kanji) OMG is a tale of an atheist Kanji Lalji Mehta who ironically runs an antique store where he stocks idols of Hindu Gods. Kanji never leaves an opportunity to gain a quick buck off the believers’ blind faith. His wife Susheela (Lubna Salim) is also a ‘god-fearing’ woman who disapproves of her husband’s tactics.

Kanji plays another game off the faith of the people on the occasion of Janmashtami angering a religious guru Siddheshwar Maharaj (Govind Namdeo) which leads Kanji’s family to believe that an earthquake that damaged only his shop was a punishment by God. Soon, he discovers it was indeed only his property that got affected. Being the one who never easily gets discouraged, Kanji files for a compensation from his insurance company.

As his claim gets rejected because the earthquake was an ‘Act of God’, Kanji decides to file a case against God. This is where the actual plot kicks off. Mehta transcends on to a path to make his case work when no lawyers offer their services. Akshay Kumar plays Krishna Vasudev Yadav or GOD! and helps out our protagonist to defend himself in a life-threatening attack on a motorcycle, a chopper bike! The whole sequence isn’t an action masterpiece but it kinda suits the production value of the film.

The second half of the film provides more content to the main lead’s fight against God and the eventual fight with the parasitic God’s men i.e. a few more Babas, a Mata and Muslim maulanas and a priest from the Church. Kanji becomes a mass hero for similar sufferers of a horrible calamity meted out on them by ‘God’. The film shows a journey of a non-believer who finds God in his own being and more importantly of the rich God’s ‘men’ who fool the God-fearing and self-beneficiary tycoons alike.

This story’s underlying theme is a much stronger one than the overlying virtue of believing in God. The early portions of the film aren’t too special, heck even the later serious sequences aren’t too magical either, but there are small glimpses of symbolism and the Kailash Kher song is a strong epiphany of that. Paresh Rawal does a fine job of balancing his portrayal of a sarcastic and ever-inquisitive rationale. The ensemble cast also supports him, except for a few bits of hamming.

OMG Oh My God borders on downright mainstream and socially enlightening applause-fest. The overall film connects but somehow you won’t see anyone taking it seriously.

My rating: **3/4 (2.75 out of 5) 

Ferrari Ki Sawaari


Ferrari Ki Sawaari
Release Date: June 15, 2012
Directed by: Rajesh Mapuskar
Cast: Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Ritvik Sahore, Deepak Shirke, Nilesh Diwekar, Satyadeep Mishra, Seema Pahwa

There’s a difference between a feel-good film and an over-the-top mind numbing cringe fest. Ironically, the two types listed above are sold off as ‘feel-good’. Ferrari Ki Sawaari is somewhat of a pullback to the former type. Here is a tale that portrays a not-so-above-the-Parsi-poverty-line family, that is content with what they have & still believe in making it big.

Rustom/Rusy (Sharman Joshi) is a righteous man with his morality bordering on abnormal. While Rustom’s father, Deboo (Boman Irani) is a cribbing, grumpy old man who spends all his time by watching the TV on his couch. Rusy’s son, Kayo (Ritvik Sahore) is a talented young cricketer, but his grandfather isn’t much pleased about him playing cricket altogether. Between these conflicts, there is an opportunity for Kayo to break out into a major cricket training schedule in Lords, England.

What ensues this is a throwaway of a lot of entertaining characters doing their parts perfectly and fitting into the mould of the film in a fine way. Out of all, Babbu Didi (Seema Pahwa) comes out as one of the most endearing characters out of the entire ensemble cast. It’s a shame I can’t find her name anywhere. Not even on the internet! Sachin Tendulkar’s apartment guard (Deepak Shirke) and the chauffeur (again, couldn’t find the name) keep you laughing throughout their sequences. The influential father-son duo provide for the comedic melodrama.

The film is entirely based in Bombay, describing what parts of a car are sold in which part of the town, again, entertaining. Ferrari Ki Sawaari wins in bits and pieces and not a single moment tends to get monotonous or unappealing, except for the tad exaggerated depiction of kindness at the end.

Rajesh Mapuskar’s first directorial venture doesn’t give off a rookie feel, job well done. Major props for the casting and the performances of the protagonists along with the aforementioned ensemble cast. The script is elevated by a several notches because of all these binding factors.

Ferrari Ki Sawaari is a delighting watch for that old-school feel good experience, capturing powerful moments along the way.

My Rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

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