Posts Tagged ‘ Nimrat Kaur ’

Airlift

Airlift-poster

Airlift
Release date: January 22, 2015
Directed by: Raja Krishna Menon
Cast: Akshay Kumar, Nimrat Kaur, Inaamulhaq, Purab Kohli, Prakash Belawadi, Kumud Mishra

What the entire world and its cousin, i.e. Venus and/or Mars, seem to have forgotten in the annals of history, Raja Krishna Menon attempts to resuscitate after the recent rescue efforts by the Indian government to bring back Indians from the currently war-torn regions of Iraq and Syria. The ‘original’ airlift mission of 1990 is all but faded away, where not a single source on the internet credits Sunny Matthews and a certain Mr Vedi, a man whose first name is not in print anywhere. All the glory for the biggest rescue operation is handed out to the Indian government of that period, and its bureaucrats.

Menon creates a solitary character out of the multiple men that formed the core committee of the entire initiative in Kuwait and names him Ranjit Katiyal (Akshay Kumar), a self-centered businessman who prides himself in being a Kuwaiti and flinches even at Hindi music that his driver happens to play on a car ride just a day before the unexpected Iraqi invasion of Kuwait. Then Iraq president, Saddam Hussein’s army of 16 year olds runs wild and sets fire, its guns and penis at everything that is Kuwaiti. People of Indian origin do get a leeway as Hussein considered them as friends.

After witnessing a relatively not-so-barbaric act of war, Katiyal panics and fears for the safety of his family. On his wife’s insistence, he decides to flee to London. He tries to crack a deal with Iraqi Major Khaled (Inaamulhaq) through which he can escape the country. Katiyal, on the way back home, stops over at his office, only to see all of his employees huddled together. He realizes that these people have nowhere to go, and a sudden sense of self-realization sets in him. He decides to use his power and money to guarantee the security of these Indian employees.

He goes to great lengths to keep them protected, but that wouldn’t be enough if they are to stay alive. He tries to establish communication with the apathetic ministry of external affairs back in India. Katiyal goes back and forth between being a messiah and a self-doubting fool of hope, thus offering Akshay Kumar to perform as well as he does. Nimrat Kaur as Amrita finds her feet slowly into the film, shining in moments where her husband is questioned, or questions himself. The soppy and unnecessary romantic track playing in the background looks great as Kaur flashes her smile at her character’s husband, thus displaying the individual strength that she brings to the table.

Prakash Belawadi’s character George Kutty is a small gem in itself. He’s the ever grumbling Malayali middle-aged man who feels entitled all the time and shows his displeasure with anything in an over-the-top fashion. We all know rambling ”uncles” like him, and none of us are quite fond of them. Inaamullhaq, with his Saddam Hussein impression, wears the Iraqi accent like his tailor-made war jacket. He’s charmingly slimy as the money-hungry mid-level army officer. Akshay Kumar feeds off the support characters and restrains his character and even lets his vulnerability flow out in tears. His character indulges in conversational humor, the kind which Kumar must have forgotten exists after years of slapstick tomfoolery.

Kumar ‘airlifts’ his acting career every year with one ‘good’ film and this time he lets the film overpower him. Where his peers are still vehemently coloring their beards and hair to appear younger, Kumar repeatedly lets his age show realistically; making you hope that he sticks to just this way of working and age gracefully by giving up on the silly franchise films he keeps acting in. But again, that’s his prerogative. Airlift has moments of thrill, often scaring you of the consequences. Menon and his cinematographer Priya Seth shoot special scenes just to show how potentially dangerous the young Iraqi soldiers can be, creating a sense of doom in the viewers’ minds every time they appear. The limited, but gruesome depiction of war crimes is the biggest achievement of the film, and in that they create a very strong antagonist.

The bureaucracy red-tape angle plays calmly in parallel where Kumud Mishra as Sanjiv Kohli keeps knocking on the door of his superiors to rescue the Indians in Kuwait. He fights his own small battle and provides for a good subplot within the film.

Airlift is a poignant tale of how a few Indians carried out one of the most successful mass-evacuation and serves as an important reminder of, as a line goes in the film, “Chot lagne par ma-ma hi chillaate hain“.

My rating: **** (4 out of 5)

The Lunchbox

The_Lunchbox_poster
The Lunchbox
Release date: September 20, 2013
Directed by: Ritesh Batra
Cast: Nimrat Kaur, Irrfan Khan, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Bharati Achrekar, Denzil Smith, Nakul Vaid, Lillete Dubey, Yashvi Puneet Nagar

Delectably assorted tiers of steel boxes, make their way from the homely kitchens to the hustling offices and other workplaces, with the dabbawalas playing the role of the messenger–a regular urban activity, is picked up by Ritesh Batra and he gives vivid roles to all the three parties involved. Where the dabbawala is the inadvertent cupid (in denial) between an unlikely couple.

Ila (Nimrat Kaur) is a modern housewife, in need of validation from her husband Rajiv (Nakul Vaid) She gets the wanted and unwanted advice from the Deshpande Aunty (Bharati Achrekar’s voice) be it cooking or listening to endless cassettes from the 80s and 90s, they do it all together. In a bid to win Rajiv all over again, Ila cooks the most scrumptious meal she has ever cooked yet.

On the other end of the spectrum, rather the receiving end, is Fernandes (Irrfan Khan) a bank employee working for the claims department for the past 35 years, and is about to retire in a month. He’s a widower, who smokes and watches TV while he’s at home in the evening. He doesn’t dole out free smiles either. Two common emotions between these disconnected characters is the longing for a loved one, in the absence or even the presence of that person.

The tiffin packed with the spices and an effervescent letter becomes the ritual and what they bode on are the general changes in Bombay, their personal habits, their fancies. All of it, without seeing each other through the entire film. The actors deliver perfect emotions that resemble intimate moments, even in isolation. Siddiqui plays the enigmatic yet annoying newbie at the bank, Aslam. He keeps pushing Fernandes to the limit only to catch him off guard enjoying his tiffin.

However, as perfect this film appears, I was baffled at the subsided treatment given to the fringe characters, like the co-employees at the bank, thus adding to inconsistencies with Fernandes’s character (with respect to what Aslam says he’s heard from the other guys at the bank). There’s a certain feeling of holding back, the cards seem just a bit too close to the chest. Perhaps more of these flaws get masked by Khan’s crowning realistic acting, Kaur’s timed insecure expression and the sheer delight of receiving yet another letter. If there’s a film about Bombay’s current face and its constant battle with overcoming nostalgia, it cannot be better than The Lunchbox.

Ritesh Batra’s transitions are simplistically captivating. He takes the usual and turns it into fitting devices for the screenplay to forward. Shot on real locations with camerawork that resembles the same innocuous stolen glances which the characters share with the letters exchanged through the lunchbox, Michael Simmonds is impish as he delves into the character’s camaraderie with the same fringe characters, thus making them inclusive again.

I don’t know about Oscar selections or National Awards, but The Lunchbox is as close as a film can get to your heart, even if no one uses a mobile phone in the entire film. It’s just food, Bombay and the memories here.

My rating: **** (4 out of 5)

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