Posts Tagged ‘ Milind Soman ’

Bajirao Mastani

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Bajirao Mastani
Release date: December 18, 2015
Directed by: Sanjay Leela Bhansali
Cast: Ranveer Singh, Milind Soman, Aditya Pancholi, Mahesh Manjrekar, Priyanka Chopra, Tanvi Azmi, Deepika Padukone, Vaibbhav Tatwawdi

Newspaper gossip columns and bytes from the “entertainment” industry have a way of finding ways into our lives, how much ever we may resist their passive charms. There have been colored headlines talking about Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s ambitions of making a magnum opus on the relationship between Bajirao Ballal Bhat and his wives Kashi Bai and Mastani. After publicly confessing of giving up on this project, Bhansali creates, right from his first scene of the film, a masterful universe from the eighteenth century.

The opening sequence is an open court where the appointment of a new Peshwa is in order. The Chhatrapati (Mahesh Manjrekar) indulges his political adviser (Aditya Pancholi) and his war-chief (Milind Soman) over their debate of who should be elected. Without song and dance, and armed with only a thumping and catchy background score and his sword, emerges Bajirao (Ranveer Singh) with a freshly buzzed head and a mouth full of memorable lines. His instant wit, will and skill seal the deal for him, and the decision is accepted with a warm ovation. Mr. Bhansali takes a detour from his usual ways and gets his film running at a good pace right from the start.

Bajirao leads his battalion to a smart victory in his first battle, proving his mettle to one and all. While he carried on with his conquers, his younger brother Chimaji Appa (Vaibbhav Tatwawadi) creates a new rambunctious home to complement Bajirao’s laurels. The home and the Aainaa Mahal are marvels of wonder, almost worth the price of the ticket just by themselves. Kashi (Priyanka Chopra) garnishes and adorns it with her conceding love and admiration for her husband. The two of them have a delicately playful and intimate relationship which is faced by the attractions of Mastani (Deepika Padukone), the love child of a Rajput King and his Muslim wife.

Mastani is the princess of Bundelkhand, out to seek the help of the brave Maratha warrior to fend off the claws of the Mughals. She can fight, and do Kathak, and elude swords with swords of her own. Her introduction to the dynamic brings the conflict along with it. A Muslim second wife cannot be accepted in a kingdom based on establishing a Hindu state. The Brahmins of Pune and Bajirao’s mother (Tanvi Azmi) along with Chimaji stand together in opposition of his union with Mastani. The entire drama between the wives, Kashi and Mastani, is handled with grace and tact.

Wars are shot in magnanimous scale, moments of passion between Bajirao and Kashi with warm diffusion, yet there’s an old school approach of keeping the second wife Mastani physically disconnected with her lover and just an amount of “obsessive” platonic love between them. Perhaps, to stay safe from more allegations and stupid “my sentiments are hurt” litigation suits against the film. If you’re denied of watching this film by the way of a protest against the film, then it’s just your bad luck.

Yes, there are cinematic liberties and a fair disclaimer before the film begins. There’s a Dil Dola like number where Kashi and Mastani dance to their heart’s content with the poetic undertone of being involved in a Rukmini-Krishna-Radha love triangle. Bajirao stomps and swirls in a shoddily-penned war celebration song. But then, Bhansali compensates for these excesses by giving us powerful exchanges between the protagonists and lines of dialogue that will be remembered for quite some time in the near future.

The beauty of it all is all-encompassing with the film’s cinematographer, Sudeep Chatterjee’s lens captures Bhansali’s vision immaculately. The color palette isn’t as diverse as that of Ram-Leela (2013), but the limited number of permutations and combinations are put to use smartly. Be it the rain in the times of war-cries, the golden glow on Mastani, or the earthy shades around Kashi, they all add to the mise en scene in more ways than one.

Ranveer Singh ascends to new heights of stardom with his all guns blazing display, with his impassionate Marathi diction and the swashbuckling flamboyance of a great mass-leader. His character is the center of the attraction for the two women, and the actor himself is the center of the movie. He holds the film strongly with good supporting actors subordinating the ranks beneath him. Priyanka Chopra and Deepika Padukone’s characters are treated with equal importance, the way Bhansali did back in 2002 in Devdas. Chopra infuses a strong energy with her spirited Kashi Bai, Padukone is the glum, poetry-quoting, wronged lover to the hilt.

Bajirao Mastani is dramatic, and it’s poised. It’s majestic and it’s cruel. It is, undoubtedly, the film to watch this weekend.

My rating: **** (4 out of 5)

David

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David
Release date: February 1, 2012
Directed by: Bejoy Nambiar
Cast: Neil Nitin Mukesh, Vikram, Vinay Virmani, Tabu, Isha Sharvani, Nasser, Shweta Pandit, Sheetal Menon, Monica Dogra, Milind Soman, Saurabh Shukla, Akarsh Khurana, Satish Kaushik, Vinod Sherawat, Rohini Hattangadi, Nishan

David is a film set around three disjoint lives with the same name, i.e. David. Spanning across three different timelines and environments. London in 1975, Bombay in 1999 and Goa in 2010, the name is retained along with fluid, gripping and entertaining character storylines.

Neil Nitin Mukesh’s David is based in London during the ’70’s. Ghani (Akarsh Khurana) is a hardcore Muslim extremist with an influential clout. David is Ghani’s  son-like protege, who has been with him ever since he was a little boy. David’s spent his entire life learning Ghani’s ways and as a part of his family. Noor (Monica Dogra) is David’s love interest and there’s binding chemistry between them. Soon there’s a bounty on the warlord’s head and there are some consequential decisions to be made.

Vinay Virmani is the David from Bombay, in the year 1999. He is a struggling guitarist-cum-vocalist who’s quite the young rebel with his taunts and small jabs aimed at his father Pastor Noel (Nasser) and his preaching ways. Sheetal Menon and Shweta Pandit play their roles as David’s sisters and provide for a balancing foil between the two male horizons of the family. Noel helps out the poor and oppressed of his locality, and eventually falls prey to a Hindu right wing political party’s manipulative tactics.

Vikram is the third David of this line and he’s situated in Goa in the year 2010. He has been left at the altar on his wedding day, thereby turning him into a drunkard. Frenny (Tabu) is the only one who sympathizes with him in the entire village. She doles out advice to David and he claims her to be one of the only two women he can tolerate. Peter (Nishan) is his partner in their fishing business. He plans on marrying the mute-and-deaf Roma (Isha Sharvani) so that he can get a boat in return as a gift from her parents. Love strikes its arrow and there are muddled mutual feelings involved, or so David thinks because of Roma’s disability.

Each story has its own flavor but yet at the end, they connect with a simple message of letting go. Be it anger, hate or love. The Goan David provides for a fun breather between the grim and dark Londoner David and the constantly moving Bombayite David. The camerawork is nearly immaculate with a neo-noir depiction of the gangster tale, the urbane settings of Mumbai and easy on the eye and pleasing in Goa. The background score combined with the music is refreshingly vivid and suiting.

There are so many characters, each with their own traits, that blend in with the changing moods of the narrative. Lara Dutta and Saurabh Shukla’s cameos are particularly special. Monica Dogra’s dialogue delivery was very good given the heavy Urdu diction of that entire traditional Muslim arrangement. Except for one place, I won’t specify it though. The relationship between Tabu and Vikram’s characters is also a welcomed one, it’s not the usual lovey-dovey one, but it’s an essential one. The three protagonists are very fitting in their individual performances. Also, Akarsh Khurana’s Ghani also delivers a special mention.

All in all, David as a film, is a winner. The innovative storytelling, visuals, characters and writing are brilliantly manifested in Bejoy Nambiar’s magnum opus of sorts. I’d watch it again, you should watch it too.

My rating: **** (4 stars)

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