Posts Tagged ‘ Mahie Gill ’

Saheb Biwi aur Gangster Returns

saheb-biwi-aur-gangster-returns-poster
Saheb Biwi aur Gangster Returns
Release date: March 8, 2013
Directed by: Tigmanshu Dhulia
Cast: Jimmy Shergill, Mahie Gill, Irrfan Khan, Soha Ali Khan, Raj Babbar, Sitaram Panchal, Pravesh Rana, Deepraj Rana, Rajesh Khera, Rajeev Gupta

Saheb Biwi aur Gangster, the prequel was charming, arousing and scintillating. The task of maintaining the earlier film’s integrity and matching up to its levels was real tough, but there are many loopholes and cover-ups in this sequel.

Continuing from the first film, Sahib (Jimmy Shergill) has survived, but is paralyzed and wheelchair-ridden. Even with a handicap, his influence or rather mean imposing nature hasn’t diminished. With his wife, Biwi (Mahie Gill) serving political office, he decides to marry Ranjana (Soha Ali Khan) forcibly. Ranjana is another former king, Birendra Pratap’s (Raj Babbar) daughter. Pratap is promised other royal gains in return for a hushed engagement ceremony between his daughter and Sahib.

Inderjeet Singh, the Gangster (Irrfan Khan) gets involved in the plot as Ranjana’s lover and goes on to become a part of the larger plan. With romantic allegiances forming and crumbling, it is the same powerplay of Sahib Biwi aur Gangster that eventually takes the center stage. The writers devise contemporary topics into the narrative, like a localized version of Anna Hazare’s fast or the actual proposal of dividing the state of Uttar Pradesh in 4 smaller states.

The smart deployment of politicized gimmicks along with witty and the much sought after impactful lines provide the foil for the faults in the repetitive double crosses and lack of depth to one of the film’s major players, i.e. Mahie Gill’s character. She’s incredibly sexy but lacks the punch. The individual performances also try compensating for the mentioned drawbacks, wherein Irrfan and Shergill stand out.

Out of the repeated ensemble cast, Rajeev Gupta’s dumb minister is perhaps the best. And this is how the film sets up, there are exclusive flashes of brilliance but they never translate into a collective display of overall excellence. Sahib Biwi aur Gangster Returns’ valleys leave you tepid and drowned out even with its constant peaks.

My rating: **1/2 (2.5 out of 5)

Dabangg 2

Dabangg 2 poster
Dabangg 2
Release date: December 21, 2012
Directed by: Arbaaz Khan
Cast: Salman Khan, Sonakshi Sinha, Prakash Raj, Arbaaz Khan, Vinod Khanna, Manoj Pahwa, Deepak Dobriyal

Before I start appraising/berating this movie, I’d just clarify that I am not going to waste any words and be all ‘straight to the action’ just like Bhai Salman or Salman Bhai.

Salman Khan’s character Chulbul Pandey is transferred from a small town to a comparatively larger town, and that’s what you expect from this sequel to Dabangg, to move to a higher level. But no. Director/actor Arbaaz Khan takes up the same mould as that of the first part and fills up the screen with almost repetitive gloss. There’s no room for the evolution of any of its characters, for example: Sonakshi’s still the same coy Indian bride, rather subsided, belittling everything that her “Thappad se darr nah lagta” line did in the prequel.

The plot is pretty much your standard 80’s ‘story’. Chulbul Pandey’s transfer to Kanpur ticks off the political bigwigs and goons alike, and a new ‘villain’ is born as Bachcha Thakur (Prakash Raj) and his brothers. One thing leads to another and just those two things happen and holy shit, you have the climax in front of you and you don’t even feel that major fight sequence brewing. There’s the shirt ripping too, but when you notice how desperately they’ve got to remove them, you’ll laugh. I laughed!

The only saving grace (?) could have been the lines and dialogue. But there’s not one memorable line that you’ll take along with you. So, a commercial entertainer without a thumping build towards the climax and all around short in most of the departments isn’t even a good ‘no-brainer fun flick’, right? Right!?

I know I am right. I leave this review the way I am leaving it so that you know how I felt when this film got over. INCOMPLETE. (Start singing this Backstreet Boys number, people)

P.S. Extra half star for the Fevicol item number.

My rating: *1/2 (1.5 out of 5)

Paan Singh Tomar Review

Paan Singh Tomar stillPaan Singh Tomar
Release Date: March 2, 2012
Directed by: Tigmanshu Dhulia
Cast: Irrfan Khan, Mahie Gill, Vipin Sharma, Imran Hasnee, Rajendra Gupta

An athlete is driven by higher amounts of inspiration and adrenalin which can only be compared with that of a possessed gun-flashing rebel. The finishing line or the result can only get them to salvation. Paan Singh Tomar (Irrfan Khan) is a no-nonsense disciplined army man who will take even a run around the planet, if ordered by his seniors. He’s seen as a very tough nut to deal with due to his dacoit lineage & Paan’s discerning pride of that, he speaks what he believes in. Paan’s running skills which he’s oblivious of, until they are discovered Major Masand (Vipin Sharma) proove to be a powerful tool to get him off the rolling lists and into the army athletics. 

Tomar travels the world and earns medals, he gets addicted to the finishing line.  The 1965 war is up on the country, and Paan yearns for his call to serve the motherland that he loves; only to be told that the military sportspersons cannot participate in the battle. Back in his village, his cousin is running wild with his seven licensed rifles and berates Paan in front of his brother Matadin (Imran Hasnee) and other villagers. He vandals their fields and brandishes all his metal-covered muscle. Meanwhile Paan, who was kept from serving in the war, wanted to satisfy all his desire. He’s said to be double the age of his co-participants, but still pulls together a win that makes him realize that his time with the games could be over. 

Concerned by all his family disputes, Tomar decides to take up early retirement. Matters get worse, and Paan is subjected to apathy from all quarters he seeks help from. He creates a troupe of men, which includes his god-fearing brother Matadin, Matadin’s son and a few more oppressed youngsters. The fire of vengeance reaches its fulfillment to some extent, but race still isn’t over. It is still a race for him and he strives to reach the finishing line. 

Irrfan Khan breezes through with the local dialect as if he was born into it. Tigmanshu Dhulia ranges the depth of Paan’s character from subtle to vociferous and abusive. Never falling out of line with the story’s needs. The film remains intriguing and evokes a certain amount of empathy at various points. You are provided with English subtitles, since the dialogue dabbles with a lot of local terms. Paan calls himself a Baaghee (rebel) and never a dacoit. This is one biopic you cannot afford to miss out on. 

My Rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5) 

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