Posts Tagged ‘ Konkona Sen Sharma ’

Akira

Akira Poster

Akira
Release date: September 2, 2016
Directed by: AR Murugadoss
Cast: Sonakshi Sinha, Anurag Kashyap, Konkona Sen Sharma, Ankita Bhargava, Nandu Madhav, Amit Sadh

AR Murugadoss has a reputation for rehashing South Indian blockbusters and infusing them with bone-shattering violence and a few metal rods scattered here and there, for the ease of more, right, violence! Akira, surprisingly, isn’t as loaded on the pow-wow where it could potentially render you indifferent to the proceedings on screen.

For its run-time of 138 minutes, the film crams in a lot of contrivances, themes, and not many didactic messages. Akira, the character’s exposition is laced with a strong little social commentary. The young girl in Jodhpur is enrolled in a martial arts class by her father and a very formative situation leads her to being locked up in the remand home. There’s tremendous scope of using this detail into something bigger for when she grows up, but then the makers choose to fly by all of it in a song sequence. Fortunately, the only song sequence of the film.

Post her return and acquittal, the adult Akira (Sonakshi Sinha) doesn’t face any major social stigma or ostracization. Her family thinks that they are transporting her to Mumbai for her greater good, and maybe, she will have more options in education. Akira is smarter than that. She knows better, yet she relents.

In Mumbai, ACP Rane (Anurag Kashyap) rolls a censored object in a police vehicle, while his subordinates look on, scared for their lives as he insists on driving the car and pulling off a stunt. Rane is the perfect antagonist for any and every protagonist. He is vicious, corrupt, cunning, and sadistically enjoyable to watch. A few hundred things and some terribly grating scenes later, Akira and Rane end up crossing paths and here begins an elaborate attempt to eliminate her.

The deck is heavily stacked against Akira, who, to her credit, never goes soft. Even when her horribly naive family believes a theory concocted by Rane’s men. If there’s ever an sequel to this, please make her abandon them. Rabiya (Konkona Sen Sharma) is a tepid implicit supporting character to Akira’s struggles. She labors her way through a pregnancy and acts all alone to investigate the film’s highlight case.

Did I mention there are a few more badly shot sequences inside a completely caricaturish mental asylum?

To the film’s credit, Akira’s character is never held as a damsel in distress, and never are her combat skills disregarded. In a slightly humorous moment, she even indulges herself in a little humble-brag while beating up chumps in a cafe. The action choreography, and her movements, on the other hand, aren’t as polished as one would expect from an out-and-out action film specialist. Sonakshi is given little range to play around with her facials, as her character remains majorly reticent and brooding in the second half.

Then there are the convenient logical flaws with the story which don’t hurt the plot much, but make it harder to invest thoroughly into the film. At the same time, the film doesn’t try to tick all the boxes of a commercial entertainer, wherein it doesn’t bother to append a mandatory love interest or deviates to a course that completely appears out of place.

Akira isn’t a film about women empowerment or a lesson in equality for female lead characters in Hindi cinema. But the fact that all of its focal story points are women: be it the girl who gets acid thrown in her face by an obnoxiously self-entitled jilted stalker, the girl who Rane exploits, the altruistic Rabiya’s earnest will or even the poorly dubbed transgendered sidekick at the asylum; the issues that these women face, and the strength which they depict and act with, makes it an important and a fairly entertaining watch.

My rating: **1/2 (2.5 out of 5)

EK Thi Daayan

Ek Thi Daayan Movie Poster
Ek Thi Daayan
Release date: April 15, 2013
Directed by: Kannan Iyer
Cast: Emraan Hashmi, Konkona Sen Sharma, Huma Qureshi, Kalki Koechlin, Pavan Malhotra, Visshesh Tiwari

Kannan Iyer’s directorial debut is a film that obviously deals with a Daayan (witch) what remains to be seen is how he uses the age old gimmick in a modern setting. Ek Thi Daayan is indeed based around a contemporary background.

Bejoy Mathur (Emraan Hashmi) is an accomplished magician under the stage name of Bobo The Baffler. He baffles his audience with his tricks and plays, while he continues to be baffled by events in his personal life. Baffler, baffled. Let the chuckles flow, maybe? There are flashes from his childhood and he can’t help zoning out. He seeks professional help and gives us an entire retelling of events from the eleven year old Bobo’s point of view.

The younger Bobo – played out by Visshesh Tiwari, gives us an account over his fascination for the dark world of ghosts, his belief in the philosophy of a local hell for every building where the troublesome oldies who object to children playing and sleepy guards reside. Cute and eerie at the same time. He addresses his issues with his governess Diana (Konkona Sen Sharma) by objectifying her as a Daayan.

The consultant points out that all of what bad he attributes to Diana could possibly be his hatred for a “stepmom” taking over and this is where a small doubt is created in your mind if Bobo is actually stable. Running perfectly until here, it captures the obvious ludicrousness of the plot consciously by inducing humor at various points. Huma Qureshi’s portrayal of Tamara, Bobo’s fiancee is fine by me and there’s not much ham-and-cheese by any of the actors. Konkona is the right muse that contains her character’s mystique.

The younger Bobo and his older counterpart are visually different, yet fitting in their emotional depictions. Kalki with her ‘obsessed fan’ persona puts up right amount of crazy. All problems with the much subtle horror approach spring up when the grand finale ensues, a fight between relatively unrealistic jumps and falls. Again, it’s all got to do with your suspension of disbelief but compared to the sophisticated handling of the topic until the climax, it might make you feel disconnected with a strongly supernatural flavor to it.

Ek Thi Daayan gives you the chills and also doesn’t put you off with a loud background score. It does go down the same beaten path of spirits and black magic rituals, but there’s a story with nuanced undertones. Simply put, it’s watchable and entertaining.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5 stars)

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