Posts Tagged ‘ Kiran Kumar ’

Brothers

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Brothers
Release date: August 14, 2015
Directed by: Karan Malhotra
Cast: Akshay Kumar, Jackie Shroff, Sidharth Malhotra, Jacqueline Fernandez, Shefali Shah, Kulbhushan Kharbanda, Ashutosh Rana, Kiran Kumar

Amongst the innumerable remakes that spring up in Hindi cinema every year, I can’t hold the remake against the original as a huge chunk of these films are unknown entities for me. I happen to be acquainted well with the film that Brothers is adapted from, i.e. Warriors. The 2011 original was supremely grim, slightly contrived and largely dramatic and ruthless in its handling of  severed bonds and their consequences.

Karan Malhotra willingly waters down every ingredient of the film, to accommodate two excruciatingly grating and intolerably long flashbacks and one of them is, to put it politely, quite useless. David (Akshay Kumar) and Monty (Sidharth Malhotra) are, you guessed it right, brothers. According to the film’s technicalities, foster-brothers, but yeah. The wedge driven between them is drawn by their alcoholic father Gary (Jackie Shroff) who is a former “underground fighter”.

The sons take off individually in their father’s flight and grow up to be… “underground fighters”! David has a family and is therefore forced to lead a more secure lifestyle. His daughter has an ailment which is mentioned verbally thrice in the span of thirty minutes and is almost forgotten thereafter. The film overloads itself with stereotypes and works up a formula for the order of proceedings, and that is how it plays out; emotions before the interval, and all the fighting humdrum after.

To be fair, the original film didn’t boast of being very innovative in the first place, but Brothers just goes on to kill any blemish of innovation or experimentation which could have possibly existed. It bludgeons your intelligence with mediocre storytelling, awful commentating and it thrashes your ears with its jarring background score and the painfully unimaginative soundtrack. The extensive length of the flashbacks rule out adequate screen-time and thus any scope for showing any range for the actors.

Jackie Shroff gets to be around as the bumbling, incoherent drunk and he’s a perfect 8 (8 because the film has obviously lowered its own set of expectations). Jacqueline looks good and talks her own limited Hindi. Who could have thought this would have been an achievement for an actor in a Hindi film! Kumar and Malhotra look their parts and immerse themselves in the often technically unsound action sequences. Kareena Kapoor does a faux striptease.

The film’s climax, which was very emotionally touching to see in Warrior, stands overwrought here as there is no empathy for the two pieces of beef grappling on the screen. You’re asked to feel an ocean of grief and a few more things when they fail to earn any of it.

My rating: *1/2 (1.5 out of 5)

Bobby Jasoos

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Bobby Jasoos
Release date: July 4, 2014
Directed by: Samar Shaikh
Cast: Vidya Balan, Ali Fazal, Prasad Barve, Aakash Dahiya, Supriya Pathak, Tanve Azmi, Benaf Dadachandji, Rajendra Gupta, Zarina Wahab, Arjan Bajwa, Anupriya Goenka, Kiran Kumar

If I push you right into the plot of the film without giving you a proper introduction to the basic story, you would feel that my review is jerky. That is just one of the only few problems with Bobby Jasoos. The wobbly start and an immediate change of course towards the last act of the film are perhaps the only major hiccups in this fun and innovative caper.

Bilkis Ahmed a.k.a. Bobby is a self-trained private detective with no professional connections, she takes up cases for her friends, and other near ones. In disguise, she can fool even her family into thinking that she isn’t the one they’re asking to read their palm, under a tree, right in the middle of a bustling street. Running her office with  Shetty (Prasad Barve) who runs his Cyber Cafe, their chemistry is slowly established. Shetty is an unsaid Salman Khan fan, he shows his fandom by never claiming it openly by wearing overly fitting t-shirts and a turquoise bracelet.

Assisting her are Munna (Aakash Dahiya) and even her family women, comprising of her mother played by Supriya Pathak, her aunt Kausar Khala (Tanve Azmi) and her sister Noor (Benaf Dadachandji) even though her father (Rajendra Gupta) is opposed  to the concept of his daughter pacing around the bylanes of Old Hyderabad, chasing random strangers and prying on their lives. A lucrative offer from Anees Khan (Kiran Kumar) starts adding the stars and honors to Bobby’s credentials, but as she progresses she realizes it isn’t just a spy job.

The detailing in Bobby’s appearance is precious to look at, she carries a handy pack of Parle-G biscuits and a bottle of water handy in her backpack. She pretends to be busy when an able competitor shows up to check out her office. Even her friends, be it Shetty or Tasawwur (Ali Fazal) who seeks her help to reject prospective brides, have their own likeability factor going for them. Ali Fazal grows as a performer and suits the part perfectly. The ensemble of Gupta, Pathak, Azmi, Dadachandji and Kiran Kumar assist in keeping even the bit players entertaining.

The strength of Bobby Jasoos lies in its writing and acting, up until the final resolution to the film’s major conflicts. The unveiling of the climactic suspense is disappointing, not as much as a heavy underhanded attempt at keeping the film feel-goody. The way the makers decide to pull it through, leaving behind some vital hints behind, the jigsaw pieces don’t fit into the puzzle perfectly. Coupled with a completely unnecessary song-and-dance dream sequence number, the poor music and background score don’t help their case either.

Again, Vidya Balan is the quintessential ‘hero’ of the film here, and the director chooses to treat her struggles at the family front with as much justice as her professional dilemmas. It’s a simple scene at the end, it is touching, but as a viewer, I didn’t feel particularly moved by its purpose and the lines said by the two involved characters here. Surely the moments of Bobby’s professional growth and the inkling of a love life were the most enjoyable portions for me.

Bobby Jasoos with its rich template of cinematography and colorful moments is a good film with its flaws. Not many makers dare to venture with a story as unconventional as this at its core.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5)

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