Posts Tagged ‘ Indraneil Sengupta ’

Satyagraha

Satyagraha_Poster Satyagraha
Release date: August 30, 2013
Directed by: Prakash Jha
Cast: Amitabh Bachchan, Indraneil Sengupta, Ajay Devgn, Amrita Rao, Kareena Kapoor, Manoj Bajpai, Arjun Rampal, Vipin Sharma, Vinay Apte

Satyagraha, Prakash Jha’s take on corruption and its deep roots in our administration, has a lot to offer. Star power, acting prowess and a country background to evoke sympathy for a topic that is consistently in the headlines are the things already working in its favor.

Manav Raghavendra (Ajay Devgn) is an ambitious youngster with a capitalistic mindset, who is ironically best friends with a socially benevolent bureaucrat in the making Akhilesh Anand (Indraneil Sengupta) whose father is an upright system-bashing retired school teacher Dwarka Anand (Amitabh Bachchan) Quoting cliches and going out on a limb against Manav’s existence, Dwarka drives him out of their home and poor Manav can’t even attend Akhilesh and Sumitra’s (Amrita Rao) wedding. Flash forward a few years down the line and both Akhilesh and Manav are in their desired positions.

Tragedy soon strikes and the Anand family faces the ignominy of paying up bribes for their deserved rights and payments. This is where the premise of an impending revolution is laid, as the promises made by the partisan leader Balram Singh (Manoj Bajpai) turn out to be void. In the absence of a second-in-command for the awakening, a small time baahubali Arjun (Arjun Rampal) and the returning tycoon Manav offer support. Incorporating the Satyendra Dubey case and the inception and the eventual falling out of the Jan Lokpal committee,

Satyagraha has less to offer on the shock factor, but the focus at how the decisions and the internal conflicts of the members of the committee develops an interesting story. The individual characters’ dilemmas show how possibly the actual Jan Lokpal could have possibly disintegrated. As much as all other of Jha’s recent films are laced with an antagonist with an underlying dumb sense of humor, Balram and his lackeys possess the same traits.

The screenplay is testing at times, the drama starts gripping you around the halfway mark. The best part about Satyagraha though is that all the characters have shades of gray, they commit mistakes and they realize (of course it’s the good guys I’m talking about) there is character growth and a graph which is clearly visible. And as for the actors, they put in great effort to play their parts right. But there’s a certain level of phony air surrounding the film which simply doesn’t let go till the end. Like Bachchan is emaciated right until the climax, but suddenly cuts a different figure at the end. The sound quality of the dialogue is suddenly very low. The extras appear clueless.

Consequently, Satyagraha is a good drama with some usual staple typecasting and unimaginative lines. Not the best film about the concerned topic, surely competitive.

My rating: **1/2 (2.5 out of 5)

Kahaani Review


Kahaani
Release Date: March 9, 2012
Directed by: Sujoy Ghosh
Cast: Vidya Balan, Parambrata Chatterjee, Darshan Jariwala, Indraneil Sengupta, Saswata Chatterjee, Nawazuddin Siddiqui.

Early posters of Kahaani proclaimed the film to be “A mother of a story”, and I was fairly titillated just by that. I wanted to know if it actually proves itself to be that good. The promos have built up a lot of scenes, but none of them really give out the thrill & suspense associated with them.

Our protagonist Vidya Bagchi (Vidya Balan), rechristened as Bidya by the local Bengalis everywhere she goes, is the heavily pregnant woman searching for her husband Arnab Bagchi. She is a software engineer who’s armed with her charm and nonchalant smile. Her reports are brushed off as just another case of a missing person by the police, until Satyaki (Parambrata Chatterjee) tries to help her out. He tells her, in Kolkata, everyone has a moniker and they are never referred to by their real names. Together, they recce every place that Arnab had described, but no one could validate his claims of being there.

Vidya holds her beliefs strong, and insists that the world is lying. It is this belief that makes her ruffle feathers of the intelligence and the powers that be. She soon realizes everything is far more complex than what appears on the front. There are layers of red-tape on her quest for her husband. The story goes on to encapsulate you within its cocoon and provides a strong self-descriptive narrative that never requires more than a few light lines & a smile from Vidya.

There are neither any jarring sound effects during the highly concerning scenes, nor there are umpteen pillow-grabbing crying sequences with songs playing at the back. Nothing is irrelevant. Though I won’t say the same about the film’s climax & its justification. Vidya Balan yet again gives a performance that leaves you gasping to catch more of this woman in the future. The ensemble cast, as shown yet again, is the major binding factor for a story to move around smoothly.

The duration of the film never remains an issue as you go through the motions. The crowded metropolis of Kolkata finds an artistic appeal through Satyajit Pande’s camera work. Overall, it is a coming-of-age story that shows us the transition that our films need to go through.

I rate it as a must-watch for getting the basics of story-telling right & coming out to be a mother of a story. (Never mind the climax)

My Rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

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