Posts Tagged ‘ Faarooq Shaikh ’

Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani

yeh_jawaani_hai_deewani_poster
Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani
Release date: May 31, 2013
Directed by: Ayan Mukherji
Cast: Deepika Padukone, Ranbir Kapoor, Kalki Koechlin, Dolly Ahluwalia, Aditya Roy Kapur, Kunaal Roy Kapur, Evelyn Sharma, Poorna Jagannathan, Faarooq Shaikh, Tanvi Azmi

A romcom about four youngsters transcending mountains, weddings and lavish costumes is what Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani appears to be from the outside. And that’s what it pretty much is.

Bunny/Kabir Thapad (Ranbir Kapoor) wants to be a globetrotter, while his friends: Aditi (Kalki Koechlin) and Avi (Aditya Roy Kapur) don’t have a set goal except for livin’ it up. On a chance meeting with the vagrantish Aditi, Naina (Deepika Padukone) who is an eternal nerd realizes what she’s been missing out on. She joins them on a trek to Manali and tries to fit in with the rambunctious trio.

And as normal people with normal hormones, there’s an attraction between the characters here as well. Only they are lopsided. Bunny decides to take a major step towards fulfilling his dreams and moves out for further studies. How all of them change and if they can reconnect after a period of eight years form the remaining tale.

The writers aim to accomplish quite a few stories here, as it always is with films with such number of leading characters. Bunny’s non-conformance to a regular lifestyle, Aditi’s suppressed feelings and her subsequent transformation, Avi’s refusal to accept his old friend, and Naina’s need to enjoy the smaller joys of life. The film’s pace is indulgent and perhaps dampening to its mood.

Ranbir and Kalki are in fine form, except for her jarred introduction. Even the smaller roles, like that of Kunaal Roy Kapur as the bumbling Taran and Faarooq Shaikh as Bunny’s father add to the narrative. Special mention for Deepika Padukone who simply looks, walks and moves like a cliche million bucks. I couldn’t comprehend for a few hours if I could ever complete this review without getting an anxiety attack while reconstructing her scenes and songs. Oh yes, the songs! They are aplenty and baffling given their length. Albeit colorful and entertaining, the dance numbers’ presence in such a capacity cannot be justified.

Also all of  Ranbir’s scenes have a ‘grand introductory scene’ like feel to them. Maybe not all of them, but a lot of them. The lines are witty and liberally funny. Yeh Jawaani Hai Deewani is shot beautifully, it lacks that finish which would have made it a more complete experience. I am not saying YJHD is not enjoyable and fun, it’s just that it could have been *that* bit better.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5 stars)

P.S. Evelyn Sharma’s unabashed hotness.
P.P.S. The P.S. deserves to be in this review goddammit!

Chashme Buddoor (Original Remastered)

chashme-baddoor-poster
Chashme Buddoor
Re-release date: April 5, 2013
Directed by: Sai Paranjpye
Cinematography: Virendra Saini
Music: Raj Kamal
Produced by: Gul Anand
Cast: Deepti Naval, Faarooq Shaikh, Rakesh Bedi, Ravi Baswani, Saeed Jaffrey, Leela Mishra
Digitally remastered by: Reliance Media Works

This is not a review, it’s more of a summary on how the 1981 film is still relevant, entertaining and a source of reference for comedies even in this age.

Before starting with it, I made a pact with myself that I’ll refrain from using the phrase “cult classic” as much as I can. So if you do not catch the free flowing mention of the overused same adjective, it’s all a deliberate task.

Chashme Buddoor was a timeless tale of three friends with a love for a vice and no other interest in common, except for Jomo (Ravi Baswani) and Omi’s (Rakesh Bedi) penchant for hitting on women consistently. The basic storyline may have been exploited in just about a few hundred succeeding comedy shows and films, but to capture the inherent spirit of the original has been nearly impossible.

I’ll be reviewing the remake later in the day, thereby judging the subsequent flurry of relativity or a new creative invention altogether. What I am sure about at the moment is that the actual innovative plot devices used here are still very quirky and hilarious. The colour restoration manages to make the aged film appear rejuvenated and vibrant. There’s very less image distortion due to grains or pixels owing to the much larger current screen size as the original resolution seems to have been retained.

There’s nostalgia; the pure innocuous nature of the lead pair relationship can never fail to evoke those certain “Aw that’s so cute” out of you. No, I didn’t do that. Okay, I almost did. The wholesome and subtle entertainment factor of the eighties’ new wave is sure to make you reminisce, if you were around for its actual release that is.

Besides all of the reasons described above, the re-release market in India is fairly poor, so if you’re not sure whether you wanna watch the new remake or invest in a promised good product, Chashme Buddoor is an easy choice to make this weekend. Kudos to the developers for pulling off a good job with the restoration and not going overboard.

And yes, it’s a treat to watch the stalwarts in all their flawless glory and also relive Kaali Ghodi Dwaar Khadi with all its simplistic appeal.

P.S. How could I resist breaking that aforementioned pact! It’s a cult classic, and you’ll be foolish to miss watching a film with a lot of smoking and without the irritating, moronic “Smoking is injurious to health” footer.

No rating

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