Posts Tagged ‘ Chitrangada Singh ’

Gabbar is Back

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Gabbar is Back
Release date: May 1, 2015
Directed by: Krish
Cast: Akshay Kumar, Shruti Haasan, Sunil Grover, Ishita Vyas, Suman Talwar, Jaideep Ahlawat

The opening credits start with shots of Gabbar/Aditya (Akshay Kumar) from the film alongside animated titles and a song called Warnaa Gabbar Aa Jaayega. The next ten minutes of the film go on about hovering around his beard, fingers, and other bodily features while he creates a list of “the ten most corrupt ‘Thasildars’ in Maharashtra”. Yes, they managed to spell Tehsildar incorrectly, and no one rectified it in a hundred post-production processes. The deliberated introduction is rather pointless, because the opening credits go over and beyond in introducing him.

The film is the Hindi remake of the Tamil film, Ramanaa, which makes it the third remake of the ‘original’. A. R. Murugadoss wrote the dialogues for the original and now he adapts the entire screenplay in this remake. None of the above two facts can compel you to watch this film though. A ham parade ensues right from the beginning where a lawyer (Shruti Haasan) spews “Google stats” all the time. If a lawyer like this were to ever get you bail, she would end up forcing the judge to imprison you forever.

Gabbar keeps targeting corrupt officials from different departments of the government and is also an athletic physics professor in a college where the students ham too. GabbarAditya has some unearthly abilities too, which are absolutely ludicrous and yet absolutely common, just like the remakes of South Indian films. The film’s most unintentionally funny running gag is where Sunil Grover as a police constable tries to make a suggestion to his bosses on how they can catch Gabbar, and all four of them shut him up in different ways.

I could see those four senior inspectors trying to shut everyone in this film up all day long.

I could just stay better off by trying to pretend they shut up too.

Audience-pandering scenes galore and boring action sequences that never gather the required steam and unoriginal and stoneage SMS forwards used as “witty one liners” further aggravate the proceedings. The Chitrangada Singh item number is gawdy to look at, but Chitrangada is not.  Did I tell you that the police officers ham too?

If Gabbar is Back were a sandwich, you’d die of a stale ham overdose.

My rating: ** (2 out of 5)

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Inkaar

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Inkaar
Release date: January 18, 2013
Directed by: Sudhir Mishra
Cast: Chitrangada Singh, Arjun Rampal, Deepti Naval, Vipin Sharma, Shivani Tanksale, Mohan Kapoor

The premise of a corporate fixture that has a serious accusation of sexual harassment lingering is quite interesting in itself. Throw in some confusing emotions between the victim and accused in it and you have a muddled plot.

Rahul Verma (Arjun Rampal) is an established advertising professional and while at an ad award function he spots Maya Luthra (Chitrangada Singh) She’s a newbie copywriter with a headstrong approach to her job. Their first encounter gets off of a more of a condescending note where Rahul tells Maya that her ad didn’t deserve any award since it didn’t focus much on the product. Soon he starts mentoring her and there is the harmless flirting turning into something more than that.

The relationship that they share becomes complicated with the commitment issues and trust problems forcing the protagonists to separate their paths. When Maya returns, she’s much refined and more goal-oriented than ever. Also engaged to another ad executive who lives in the States. Rahul’s stand over her return remains dubious with his residual feelings coming off as competitive and ego hassles.

The film runs as a background to the sexual harassment investigations held by an independent social worker (Deepti Naval) assisted by other employees of the same firm. The eventual incident which causes the stir is revealed much later in the second half thereby progressing the story between the leads. There are uncomfortable closeups, probably to cause that discomfort that the characters face. But there are moments that perhaps don’t go with the overall look and the feel of the film resulting in overdoing cinematographic gimmicks at many junctures.

The ensemble cast of Vipin Sharma as the sleazy Gupta and Shivani Tanksale as the suspecting co-employee along with Mohan Kapoor perform well, but again there are things that happen out of turn and for no significance. NOT TO FORGET: Saurabh Shukla’s atrocious lipsync to a rock number in hiphoppish attire. Also the dependence on Kanwaljit Singh’s character as Rahul’s dad to sneak out a moral high ground seems weak.

Though many would not agree with the movie’s ending, I, on the other hand find it somewhat reasonable. The message that the makers are trying to put forth is that of maybe acting on instinct and morally right decisions. Though all of this doesn’t make up for the clunky and patchy design of the film.

My rating: **1/2 (2.5 out of 5)

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