Posts Tagged ‘ Amit Trivedi ’

Bombay Talkies

Bombay_Talkies_2013_Poster
Bombay Talkies
Release date: May 3, 2013
Directed by: Karan Johar, Dibakar Banerjee, Zoya Akhtar, Anurag Kashyap
Cast: Rani Mukherji, Randeep Hooda, Saqib Saleem, Shivkumar Subramaniam, Nawazuddin Siddiqui, Sadashiv Amrapurkar, Shubhangi Bhujbal, Naman Jain, Ranvir Shorey, Vineet Kumar, Sudhir Pandey

To type a personal paragraph(s) on what I love about films or not to type: that is the question.

Indian cinema, since its inception in 1913 has come a long way. Be it technically or professionally, whether it has made advancement in telling contemporary stories in a hard hitting fashion is not to be passed upon here. Bombay Talkies tries going in for the latter parameter and that is why you should love the film in its entirety for.

There are four directors with their own separate films, not all of them exactly revolving around cinema’s impact on us, but taking on different characters’ struggles and individual tales of varying emotions. The first one is Karan Johar’s film hedlining Rani, Randeep and the fresh Saqib from Mere Dad Ki Maruti. It starts off with a pumped up confrontational opening and his camera chasing Saqib.

With a style uncharacteristic to his, Johar maneuvers a telling tale of dysfunctional relationships and the society’s collective inability of accepting things as they are. He operates in a urban setting with the idealistic middle class mentality and equates it to the high classes’ apparent double standards. The actors save the plot from becoming clunky at times.

Dibakar Banerjee explores the chawls of Mumbai, where his protagonist (Nawazuddin Siddiqui) has a pet emu named Anjali. Oh how I love his subtle comedy! Nawazuddin plays an uninspired actor and a failed businessman (sic) with limited means to support his family. It’s his apparent gumption and the inner battles that form this amusing feature.

Sadashiv Amrapukar comes out of his spiritual and literal dumpsters to give him a reality check, obviously laced with good lines. It’s the ending that simply transcends into another dimension of its own. It is divine, fulfilling and succulent. The detailing is so brilliant along with Nawaz’s simmering performance, you rejoice every moment of his swaggering presence.

Post interval, Zoya Akhtar follows up with her story of a small family whose patriarch wants his son to get ‘tough’ by making him attend football sessions in school by sacrificing the daughter’s allowance for a history trip. The boy is enamored by Katrina Kaif and wants to emulate her dance performances in his fantasyland.

The approach for establishing plot devices is a bit faulty and rushed at times, but what Akhtar captures beautifully is the sibling’s relationship. It’s a simple I-look-your-back-you-look-mine one, but it’s charming, delightful and uh, heartwarming! Kaif delivers a special message in a fairy outfit and that is an added incentive to the joyful end of this film.

Indians love their films and they worship their actors with reverence and treat them as an abstract family member. Kashyap’s film is just about that. A son carries a jar of Murabba for his father’s idol (Amitabh Bachchan) to Mumbai. The reasoning for this task is what crazy fan fictions are made up of. Vineet Kumar plays the Bachchan obsessed Sudhir Pandey’s son Vijay.

He makes his trip to Mumbai from Allahabad to realize there are just a two dozen strong other Vijays hanging outside Bachchan’s house, awaiting their chance to have a few moments with The Man. Again, the finish scene with Kumar’s return to his father is purely frolicky.

Karan Johar and Anurag Kashyap work a dark and cheery screenplay respectively; not their customary styles, which could cause some disappointments or surprise among their loyal viewers who could be expecting something more of the usual. I count it as one of the film’s strengths and a welcome change.

Altogether, Bombay Talkies is a great tribute that doesn’t focus on being one. And that is why it turns out to be so good.

My rating: **** (4 out of 5 stars) 

Kai Po Che!

kai-po-che-posterKai Po Che!
Release date: February 22, 2012
Directed by: Abhishek Kapoor
Cast: Amit Sadh, Raj Kumar Yadav, Sushant Singh Rajput, Amrita Puri, Muni Jha, Dijvijay Deshmukh

Kai Po Che! is the adaption of Chetan Bhagat’s The 3 Mistakes of My Life. The original book had a lot of real life circumstances involved in it, and Abhishek Kapoor picks and plays with the more entertaining parts.

The plot picks up at a faster speed with the three friends, Omi (Amit Sadh), Ishaan (Sushant Singh Rajput) watching a cricket match and Govind (Raj Kumar Yadav) haggling with Ishaan’s father (Muni Jha) for a cheque to sponsor the opening of their own sports good outlet. Ishaan is a talented, yet unaccomplished cricketer who harbours the dream of establishing a sports academy. Govind is the careful, hardworking, money manager who’s pleased to let others take the front seat. The third wheel, Omi, is grounded yet adventurous.

They’re later financed by Omi’s Hindu-extremist uncle and soon the cricket training starts. Ishaan spots a boy wonder and goes out of his way to convince his Muslim sympathetic father. The story then makes use of the 2001 Republic Day earthquake, 2001 Calcutta test between India and Australia, and the Godhra riots. Depicting the individual and collective struggles of the principal parts, Kai Po Che! flies along very well.

Anay Goswamy’s cinematography takes the hustling camaraderie a few notches higher with all the different colour tints. Though the writing gets vague at a few points, the dialogue remains catchy and interesting. The acting prowess of all three leads is tested and witty through the storm. Also, Muni Jha’s character just has only one dimension, which is compensated by Amrita Puri’s bubblepop  yet charming character.

Amit Trivedi’s music employs the local flavor and works it up in his ever-refreshing style, though limited but effective. I guess I’ve actually lost count of the number of times he’s decked up the soundtrack with the relevant state folk. The amount of things working in favour of Kai Po Che! obviously outnumbers the things that don’t.

Only if it had a tinge of more emotion in the narrative, Kai Po Che! would have made for a more touching tale. Nevertheless, it is aesthetically and endearingly brilliant.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Luv Shuv Tey Chicken Khurana


Luv Shuv Tey Chicken Khurana
Release date: November 2, 2012
Directed by: Sameer Sharma
Cast: Kunal Kapoor, Huma Qureshi, Rajesh Sharma, Vinod Nagpal, Rahul Bagga, Dolly Ahluwalia, Munish Makhija.

Chicken, fun flowing cinema, a man who doesn’t wear underwear, Amit Trivedi doing Punjabi music – what else do you need to instantly like this film? Ah, never mind. I’ll write out the reasons more extensively, because hey, review blog!

The story starts in London where Omi Khurana (Kunal Kapoor) is “livin’ it up” and is ironically a lot of money DOWN in loans to Shenti bhai (Munish Makhija) He’s given a limited period to repay him back and this makes Omi land back to his family home in Punjab, India. He’s greeted with changes and a new servant with a cool heavy name. His doting grandfather Darji (Vinod Nagpal) is now demented and doesn’t remember anything much, except for his dhaaba, Chicken Khurana.

Chicken Khurana is also the name of this joint’s most famous presentation, with a secret ingredient that only the old man knew and now is suppressed inside his retired mind. Omi’s aunt accepts him with love and treats him as he never did any wrong while stealing money from their own house and running away to London. His cousin Jeet (Rahul Bagga) is about to be married to Harman (Huma Qureshi) and there are buried emotions between her and Omi which leads to awkward or odd encounters.

And there’s Titu Mama (Rajesh Sharma) who claims to be mentally retarded at his sister’s life. He doesn’t like to wear underwear – boxers/trunks/ANYTHING! He eats, pees and lives the life of a hero. Or let’s just say, my hero. Days pass on and the noose tightens around Omi’s neck and he’s desperate to find a way out of his debt situation. After scrounging for a few days, he finally gets a light of hope when he’s offered one crore rupees (Rs. 1,00,00,000) for his grandfather’s secret recipe by their age-old rival Kehar Singh (Vipin Sharma).

Kunal Kapoor plays the part of a somewhat-wannabe-UK-return-Punjabi finely except for his stiff voice in volatile sequences. Huma Qureshi (gasp) looks as good as she did in Gangs of Wasseypur and depicts the transition of a pissed off doctor to a helping cook gracefully. The ensemble cast is as good, with the plot not being irrationally complicated the straightforward story moves on with no big glitches except for a few certain long conversations that could possibly give away the grip on your attention.

LSTCK isn’t just a comedy, it connects with you in its limited emotional sequences so much that you might even shed a precipitated liquid from your eye. The film is fun, unpretentious and does what it aims to do: entertain you. Anyone else saying otherwise is probably a douchebag that I won’t like for the rest of my life.

So, chicken, cinema, Titu Mama and Amit Trivedi should make you go watch this light and connective film.

My rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5)

Aiyyaa


Aiyyaa
Release date: October 12, 2012
Directed by: Sachin Kundalkar
Cast: Rani Mukherji, Prithviraj, Nirmiti Sawant, Satish Alekar, Anita Date, Jyoti Subhash, Amey Wagh, Subodh Bhave

Aiyyaa is so …. Aiyyaa is so ….. Aiyyaa tells us …. Aiyyaa is exactly like this. Slow and only entertaining in bits. An assortment of eccentric characters makes the premise for Meenakshi’s (Rani Mukherji) family. Meenakshi herself doesn’t lack in color and has a dreamland where she slips into at the slightest of chance.

Built on this, we are shown a woman who’s about to married off by her parents i.e. Meenakshi and her discoveries at a new job in an art college. Appointed as the co-librarian alongside Myna (Anita Date) whose water bottle Jumbo is known by almost everyone in college. Myna herself is the proclaimed John Abraham obsessed desi version of Lady Gaga.

Meenakshi crushes over a student Surya (Prithviraj) and eventually falls in love with his fragrance and entire personality except for the fact that they can’t make a conversation. Possessed by his presence, Meenakshi becomes enchanted with his habits and everything he does. She even follows him to his place to make out if the rumors about him are true.

The stalking never stops and Meenakshi tries her hand at learning Tamil by watching Midnight Masala and reading Tamil books. Meanwhile, her family keeps on with their parade of potential grooms and finalize on Madhav (Subodh Bhave) as Meenakshi’s most able suitor. Madhav’s character also doesn’t fall short of details and eccentricities but this is where the film falters. There are a lot of ‘funny’ and actually funny characters and situations without much of an actual plot to the entire film.

Aiyyaa wanders on for long periods of time with the same sequences repeating over and over again and with the limited plot of the film making it more intolerable in those parts. There is nice camera work, symbolic shots, good performances and stellar musical composition but all of this falls short for the lack of a strong story.

There are points in the movie where you realize a lot is going on without paying full attention to what actually is happening, and the abundance of eccentricity cannot fill for this. For instance, Meenakshi’s grandmother (Jyoti Subhash) is a victim of such overkill, where she’s laden with a gimmicky appearance and a role to play within the scope of her short screen time.

Aiyyaa is, like I earlier said, entertaining in bits and pieces. There was lot of potential in this, but it’s now not fully tapped into.

My rating: ** (2 out of 5)

Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu Review

ImageEk Main Aur Ekk Tu
Release Date: February 10, 2012
Directed by: Shakun Batra
Cast: Kareena Kapoor, Imran Khan, Boman Irani, Ratna Pathak Shah, Ram Kapoor, Manasi Scott.

Las Vegas, one of the most renowned cities for getting laid, broke and married is the place where our protagonists live, with their dreary jobs. Rahul Kapoor (Imran Khan) is an architect brought up to excel in everything that he does, may it be vanity or swimming or both of them simultaneously. His parents are quite a pair of two different humans as well, played by Boman Irani and Ratna Pathak Shah. Rahul is expected to get a gold medal that his dad has been yearning for. The beasts of burden have always haunted Rahul, he stays to be a bland and dull guy who often fumbles with his words.

Rianna Braganza (Kareena Kapoor), a hair stylist by profession is the ubiquitous opposite of Rahul. They both seek psychological help, albeit for different reasons. That is where their paths cross & you start to think it is gonna be another What Happens in Vegas. Yes, they do get married, but they are on terms for its prompt annulment. The journey that ensues is a lot of fun, since they get married on Christmas.

The film creates a bunch of refreshing situations: one where Rahul’s dad’s friend (Ram Kapoor) tries to help Rahul to get a bit ‘loose’, the date with Rahul’s ex-girlfriend. The story passes by at a steady pace in the form of days. Each day has a certain name attached to it. This rom com doesn’t make you cry, and still provides credibility. Peppered with not too imposing music by Amit Trived, the tracks remain hummable and easy to go on.

I wish not to be killed for saying this, Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu has a new feel to it. It isn’t mushy nor intolerable. Director Shakun Batra attempts at a safe approach for a debut film, but doesn’t go down the tried and tested path all the time. He serves a dessert, that has a few different ingredients with the usual ones, making it scrumptious to eat while it lasts. Watch it for a delighting experience.

My Rating: ***  (3 out of 5)

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