Wazir

wazir-poster

Wazir
Release date: January 8, 2016
Directed by: Bejoy Nambiar
Cast: Farhan Akhtar, Aditi Rao Hyderi, Amitabh Bachchan, Manav Kaul, Anjum Sharma, Nasir Khan, Neil Nitin Mukesh

Wazir hits the ground running with a quick montage to show us the origins of Daanish (Farhan Akhtar) and Ruhana (Aditi Rao Hyderi) marriage with Sonu Nigam’s sweet Tere Bin playing in the background. He’s with the Anti Terrorism Squad, and she’s a classical dancer. Together, they raise a daughter and due to Daanish’s one rash decision, their happy family is faced with a gruesome outcome.

There onwards, Daanish is continuously shown as a mope who’s too naive and impulsive for an officer with the amount of experience that he has. He deals with high octane violence and tactical ops, and yet he falls for whatever trap there is laid in front of him. Omkarnath (Amitabh Bachchan) extends an arm of friendship and consolation to the grief-struck Daanish, which he hesitatingly accepts.

The two men share a bond where both of them have a loss of a similar kind, except Omkarnath is an amputee chess maestro who’s organizing a play in his daughter’s memory. His character has a dead wife, a dead daughter, no legs, and was driven out of his home in Kashmir. There are times when he appears too happy for what he’s suffered. That, perhaps, is the gist of the writing for him. He mouths the wittiest of lines and yet, his eyes are too wide. They’re hard to believe. Shockingly, this small detail isn’t put to great use by making Daanish doubt his intentions at any point of the film.

Their common enemy, welfare minister Yazaad Qureshi (Manav Kaul) is the masterful antagonist who’s slimy and classy in equal proportions. Neil Nitin Mukesh gets a good, short cameo and John Abraham makes exactly three appearances as a “hacker” or an IT expert or, seriously, I don’t know what. The action sequences, especially the shootout in the dark scene is shot excellently. The pace never falls slow, which consequently helps yield a taut and gripping film.

Hints for the final ‘reveal’, or twist, are carefully left behind to answer all your questions. Farhan Akhtar brings a degree of restraint to his Daanish, but he can’t elevate the character above the poor writing for him. Daanish, the supposedly smart ATS officer, does things so stupid that Akhtar, the uber cool actor, can’t salvage. Omkarnath, on the other hand, is very calculative and so is Bachchan’s portrayal of the character. The amputee aspect isn’t hammered again and again (Good) and still used in subtle ways. Also, Aditi Rao Hyderi is utterly graceful with her moves and equally adept at being the fragile Ruhana.

Every song is woven well with the narrative, except a generic “Maula Mere Maula” that makes you wonder if you’re still watching the same film or a factory-made one-size-fits-all potboiler. The film earns a lot of points in the not-being-a-bore department by its sheer speed and direction. Bejoy Nambiar has delivered two richly stylized films earlier, and here he tones it down by a few notches and understandably so.

Wazir is a fast-paced film with a not a particularly smart protagonist, but it’s sharp and wily right from the opening titles to the rolling credits.

My rating: *** (3 out of 5)

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