Now You See Me

nowyouseememovieposter
Now You See Me
Release date: May 31, 2013
Directed by: Louis Leterrier
Cast: Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Mélanie Laurent, Isla Fisher, Woody Harrelson, Dave Franco, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Common, David Warshofsky

Now You See Me, Now You Don’t. This line had to fit somewhere. (I missed the start, so I give them the benefit of doubt.)
Forget that you ever read those two lines.

The summer film is a semi-thriller-cum-whodunit with the exception of the actual murder. A group of four performers: Daniel Atlas (Jesse Eisenberg), Henley Reeves (Isla Fisher), Jack Wilder (Dave Franco) and Merritt McKinney (Woody Harrelson) are assembled by an anonymous benefactor, claiming to be a member of the mystical lineage of The Eye. They find a rich sponsor in the form of insurance magnate Arthur Tressler (Michael Caine) who pits them as the next big thing in the world of magic.

After they manage to perform a heist on camera, also going against the conventions of the trade. FBI agent Dylan Rhodes (Mark Ruffalo) is assigned to be the lead investigator along with Interpol Agent Alma Vargas (Mélanie Laurent) on the whole magic fiasco. Agent Vargas is intrigued by the history aspect of their tricks and does her research 24 x 7. Literally. Thaddeus Bradley (Morgan Freeman) is a retired magician who makes money by exposing other magicians’ tricks on his TV show. Rhodes and Bradley try tracing the self proclaimed Four Horsemen’s steps.

The characters that are on the run aren’t given much footage, neither their reasons are well-established, except for a few confessions about not knowing what could happen next. The major focus is on the interpretation of their techniques by the people trying to nail them down. Jesse Eisenberg  does his usual fast-talking shtick which very much fits in with the arrogant air around his persona. Isla Fisher plays up the eye-candy quotient with spunk. The tricks and script devices are pretty slick and you are gripped until the intermission.

Mark Ruffalo is tenacious on the job, while Mélanie Laurent has the French accent and all the um, Omelette Du Fromage wonder to her character. The climax is laced with hiccups, it leaves with some questions unanswered and the rest overtly answered. Safe to say, the film disintegrates after the halfway mark. But the disintegration isn’t particularly jarring. The film leaves you half an ounce smarter about a few more magic tricks too!

My review: *** (3 stars out of 5)

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