Aiyyaa


Aiyyaa
Release date: October 12, 2012
Directed by: Sachin Kundalkar
Cast: Rani Mukherji, Prithviraj, Nirmiti Sawant, Satish Alekar, Anita Date, Jyoti Subhash, Amey Wagh, Subodh Bhave

Aiyyaa is so …. Aiyyaa is so ….. Aiyyaa tells us …. Aiyyaa is exactly like this. Slow and only entertaining in bits. An assortment of eccentric characters makes the premise for Meenakshi’s (Rani Mukherji) family. Meenakshi herself doesn’t lack in color and has a dreamland where she slips into at the slightest of chance.

Built on this, we are shown a woman who’s about to married off by her parents i.e. Meenakshi and her discoveries at a new job in an art college. Appointed as the co-librarian alongside Myna (Anita Date) whose water bottle Jumbo is known by almost everyone in college. Myna herself is the proclaimed John Abraham obsessed desi version of Lady Gaga.

Meenakshi crushes over a student Surya (Prithviraj) and eventually falls in love with his fragrance and entire personality except for the fact that they can’t make a conversation. Possessed by his presence, Meenakshi becomes enchanted with his habits and everything he does. She even follows him to his place to make out if the rumors about him are true.

The stalking never stops and Meenakshi tries her hand at learning Tamil by watching Midnight Masala and reading Tamil books. Meanwhile, her family keeps on with their parade of potential grooms and finalize on Madhav (Subodh Bhave) as Meenakshi’s most able suitor. Madhav’s character also doesn’t fall short of details and eccentricities but this is where the film falters. There are a lot of ‘funny’ and actually funny characters and situations without much of an actual plot to the entire film.

Aiyyaa wanders on for long periods of time with the same sequences repeating over and over again and with the limited plot of the film making it more intolerable in those parts. There is nice camera work, symbolic shots, good performances and stellar musical composition but all of this falls short for the lack of a strong story.

There are points in the movie where you realize a lot is going on without paying full attention to what actually is happening, and the abundance of eccentricity cannot fill for this. For instance, Meenakshi’s grandmother (Jyoti Subhash) is a victim of such overkill, where she’s laden with a gimmicky appearance and a role to play within the scope of her short screen time.

Aiyyaa is, like I earlier said, entertaining in bits and pieces. There was lot of potential in this, but it’s now not fully tapped into.

My rating: ** (2 out of 5)

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    • Himanshu about Cinema
    • December 10th, 2012

    Reblogged this on Cinema Talks.

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