Paan Singh Tomar Review

Paan Singh Tomar stillPaan Singh Tomar
Release Date: March 2, 2012
Directed by: Tigmanshu Dhulia
Cast: Irrfan Khan, Mahie Gill, Vipin Sharma, Imran Hasnee, Rajendra Gupta

An athlete is driven by higher amounts of inspiration and adrenalin which can only be compared with that of a possessed gun-flashing rebel. The finishing line or the result can only get them to salvation. Paan Singh Tomar (Irrfan Khan) is a no-nonsense disciplined army man who will take even a run around the planet, if ordered by his seniors. He’s seen as a very tough nut to deal with due to his dacoit lineage & Paan’s discerning pride of that, he speaks what he believes in. Paan’s running skills which he’s oblivious of, until they are discovered Major Masand (Vipin Sharma) proove to be a powerful tool to get him off the rolling lists and into the army athletics. 

Tomar travels the world and earns medals, he gets addicted to the finishing line.  The 1965 war is up on the country, and Paan yearns for his call to serve the motherland that he loves; only to be told that the military sportspersons cannot participate in the battle. Back in his village, his cousin is running wild with his seven licensed rifles and berates Paan in front of his brother Matadin (Imran Hasnee) and other villagers. He vandals their fields and brandishes all his metal-covered muscle. Meanwhile Paan, who was kept from serving in the war, wanted to satisfy all his desire. He’s said to be double the age of his co-participants, but still pulls together a win that makes him realize that his time with the games could be over. 

Concerned by all his family disputes, Tomar decides to take up early retirement. Matters get worse, and Paan is subjected to apathy from all quarters he seeks help from. He creates a troupe of men, which includes his god-fearing brother Matadin, Matadin’s son and a few more oppressed youngsters. The fire of vengeance reaches its fulfillment to some extent, but race still isn’t over. It is still a race for him and he strives to reach the finishing line. 

Irrfan Khan breezes through with the local dialect as if he was born into it. Tigmanshu Dhulia ranges the depth of Paan’s character from subtle to vociferous and abusive. Never falling out of line with the story’s needs. The film remains intriguing and evokes a certain amount of empathy at various points. You are provided with English subtitles, since the dialogue dabbles with a lot of local terms. Paan calls himself a Baaghee (rebel) and never a dacoit. This is one biopic you cannot afford to miss out on. 

My Rating: ***1/2 (3.5 out of 5) 

Advertisements
  1. September 5th, 2014
    Trackback from : Mary Kom | Blast A Trumpet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: